Megacolon

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megacolon

[′meg·ə‚kō·lən]
(medicine)
Hypertrophy and dilation of the colon associated with prolonged constipation.

Megacolon

 

in man, enlargement of part or all of the colon.

Megacolon usually originates with congenital immaturity of the colon’s innervation apparatus. The clinical course of the condition is characterized by persistent constipation beginning in the first years (sometimes in the first months) of life. This, the most common form of megacolon, is called Hirschsprung’s disease. In adults, megacolon may be caused by the presence of mechanical obstructions (tumor, cicatricial stenosis). Treatment is surgical.

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Dr Ing presented a case study in which a 20-year-old girl with ulcerative colitis developed toxic megacolon, resulting in her large bowel being surgically removed.
Plain radiographs are usually normal in patients with CDI, unless the patient has an ileus or toxic megacolon. CT is useful, however, in suspected cases of fulminant CDI or toxic megacolon, and may reveal colonic-wall thickening, pericolonic stranding, or ascites.
Toxic megacolon with colonic perforation complicating Campylobacter jejuni ileo-colitis.
difficile-associated diarrhea but also is associated with such diagnoses as pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon, and colon perforations which can lead to more life-threatening sepsis (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2005).
Severe CDAD exists with the occurrence of a paralytic ileus or toxic megacolon that may lead to decreased stools or even no diarrhoea being produced.
Of the 48 cases reported by the respondents, 14 infections occurred prior to delivery, 20% of the women developed recurrent disease, and three developed toxic megacolon. There was one fetal loss and one maternal death.
Of the 48 cases reported by the survey respondents, 14 of the infections occurred prior to delivery, 20% of the women developed recurrent disease, and three developed toxic megacolon. There was one fetal loss and one maternal death.
Adverse complications (toxic megacolon, sepsis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation) have been reported as a result of using these medications to treat diarrhea.
difficile-associated diarrhoea as there have been reports of loperamide and diphenoxylate-induced toxic megacolon [18, 20].
In general there are two potential life-threatening manifestations of UC -- toxic megacolon and colorectal cancer.
A: The condition is marked by several steps: diarrhea -- and consequent dehydration; fever when the inflammatory process is entrenched; arthritis of the medium-sized joints; eye inflammation; skin lesions; progressively severe bleeding causing anemia; loss of protein and swelling; and development of a toxic megacolon as the severity of inflammation spreads throughout the bowel.
Never allowing irritant laxative use, as there is an increased risk of laxative habit, toxic megacolon and possibly GI cancer in long-term users of drugs such as Dulcolax, Ex-Lax, Per-Diem, Senokot and other irritant laxatives.