toxicity

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toxicity

[täk′sis·əd·ē]
(pharmacology)
The quality of being toxic.
The kind and amount of poison or toxin produced by a microorganism, or possessed by a chemical substance not of biological origin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent literature has described the successful reversal of ten separate drug class toxicities by Intralipid emulsion rescue therapy, including amphetamines (3), antiarrhythmics (4), anticonvulsants (5), antidepressants (5), antipsychotics (6), benzodiazepines (5), calcium channel blockers (1), diuretics (5), local anesthetics (7-9), and the benzodiazepine-agonist insomnia drugs (Table 1).
The findings--which do not support current recommendations either for lower doses in older patients (because toxicities in these patients were not associated with dose size in this study) or for maximum 1,000-mg aminoglycoside doses, which could lead to underdosing in large patients--suggest that either dosing strategy can be used without affecting the likelihood of toxicity, the investigators said.
As the dose of 100 mg/m2 Schedule A resulted in manageable toxicities and a dose intensity (75 mg/m2) approximately twice that of previously tested schedules, Kosan and Roche have recommended that it be further evaluated in the upcoming Phase II studies.
(Side effects and toxicities will likely return if you restart the same drugs).
Nutrient Deficiencies and Toxicities of Plants is a digital image collection containing 600 nutrient deficiency and toxicity symptoms of 37 agronomic and horticultural crops.
Misbin, took specific note of Gueriguian's concerns regarding potential liver and heart toxicities. In an Oct.
(14) In considering whether to use HAART during the period of EPOCH therapy, we were concerned that overlapping toxicities and unpredictable pharmacokinetic interactions could lead to impaired curative potential of the EPOCH regimen.
Nothing in this letter addresses use of a single dose of nevirapine to prevent mother-to-infant transmission of HIV; these toxicities occurred in patients taking multiple doses.
Nevertheless, the acute symptoms, delayed pulmonary effects, and chronic health problems are otherwise well correlated in the context of the known toxicities of the chemicals discussed.
* If I start now, will the drug complications and toxicities outweigh the benefits?
However, significant obstacles, including potential metal accumulations and toxicities, require further research before the promise of medicinal inorganic chemistry can be realized.