tracheophyte


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Related to tracheophyte: Embryophyte, Embryophyta

tracheophyte

[′trā·kē·ə‚fīt]
(botany)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The spectrum of the leading families of tracheophyte plants in general is typical of the Holarctic floral reign [9, p.
In general, first tracheophytes are proposed to have evolved >420 million years ago, and a major innovation in the evolution of tracheophytes from their bryophyte-like ancestors was the ability to form supporting and conducting tissues that contain cells with lignified cell walls [32, 34].
The presence of limited chlorophyll in Ricciocarpus, rather than being regarded as relictual, could just as well be regarded as part of a relatively primitive (inchoate) condition of a protected (more or less enclosed), antithetically developed sporophyte--representative, perhaps, of a relatively early stage in an elaboration sequence leading to the much more abundantly chlorophyllose sporophytes of some bryophytes and most tracheophytes.
It will be interesting to compare the pattern of gene expression in "meristems" of bryophytes and tracheophytes.
The vascular plants (tracheophytes) of our biosphere are the ferns and fern allies (pteridophytes), the non-flowering seed plants (gymnosperms), and the flowering seed plants (angiosperms).
In surveying all the plants that have a vascular system (the tracheophytes), it can be seen that most of the angiosperms have vessels, most gymnosperms have none, and neither do most ferns.
In following sections it describes archaea, bacteria, viruses, fungi, the protists, bryophytes, tracheophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms.