tracking telescope

tracking telescope

[′trak·iŋ ‚tel·ə‚skōp]
(optics)
A long-focal-length telescope mounted to track missiles in flight precisely while collecting missile performance data.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
But if you add a tracking head to your tripod and align it with Polaris, the North Star, your camera will now follow the sky like a tracking telescope. Long exposures of 3 to 5 minutes become possible under a dark sky, recording the faintest extensions of the Milky Way complete with colorful nebulosity and rich star fields.
a combination of a radar fence forstare-mode detection and a chasing tracking radar or a telescope detecting fast-moving LEO objects in stare-mode which are to be followed up by a tracking telescope or an active laser ranging system.
Star-testing is easier with a tracking telescope. Otherwise you have to continuously nudge the telescope along to keep the star closely centered in the eyepiece field while watching for moments of good seeing.
One way to make observing this elusive planet easier in daytime is to set a tracking telescope on it before sunrise, and leave the drive running for a couple of hours.
While I jerry-rigged a way to piggyback the camera on a tracking telescope, it would be nice to have a standard tripod socket built into the camera's body.
The 55[degrees] field becomes less of an advantage if you use a tracking telescope, but long eye relief is always nice, especially if you wear eyeglasses while observing.
While I certainly marvel at the views through many of today's incredible wide-field eyepieces, the bulk of my observing of the Moon, planets, multiple stars, and deep-sky objects is done at medium to high magnifications with tracking telescopes. As such, I'm well served with eyepieces that have a modest field of view.
Scientists and engineers at the TNO Institute of Applied Physics in Delft, The Netherlands, build satellite tracking telescopes that can measure the distance between two points on Earth within 2 cm.