trade-wind inversion

trade-wind inversion

[′trād ¦wind in‚vər·zhən]
(meteorology)
A characteristic temperature inversion usually present in the trade-wind streams over the eastern portions of the tropical oceans: it is formed by broad-scale subsidence of air from high altitudes in the eastern extremities of the subtropical highs; while descending, the current meets the opposition of the low-level maritime air flowing equatorward; the inversion forms at the meeting point of these two strata which flow horizontally in the same direction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the storm gets within 500 miles, there aren't yet clear signs of trouble on the barometer, but pilots often notice a pronounced lowering of the trade-wind inversion. The sky looks bluer, the weather is fair, and you don't have to climb as high to reach smooth air.