stoplight

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stoplight

[′stäp‚līt]
(electricity)
One of the lights that are installed at the rear of an automotive vehicle and are automatically turned on when the driver applies the brakes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the US capital alone, about 1,000 intersections are linked to the Traffic Light Information function.
Traffic light labels show whether levels of sugar, salt and fat are high, medium or low using red, amber and green traffic light colours, and is based on the amount per 100g.
The exits to both of the council run car parks and the multi-storey one above Sports Direct became logjammed as the traffic lights failed to let enough cars through.
During the first traffic light cycle, the traffic flow velocity is highest (Fig.
In Bolgatanga, the capital of the Upper East Region, there are six intersections (no roundabouts) where traffic lights are installed.
He added: "The traffic lights were provided by a subcontractor, who is approved for traffic management by the council.
Rather than simply recognizing the color of a traffic light, an autonomous vehicle can receive data from transport management authorities directly, and this data can cause cars to decide whether to keep driving or to stop, without any need for an amber light.
Data from CTTMO bared that the defective traffic lights are in the intersections of Sta.
Through this creative design of traffic light signs, Pan hopes to develop the reputation of Pingtung as a county filled with love and to generate excitement for road-crossing activity, while also increasing traffic safety awareness for families.
In a recent tweet, the RTA stated that the traffic light signals are not hi-tech devices that can fine jaywalkers but are simply part of the authority's method in tracking its assets.
The GDN reported that a survey of 130 random people, which was launched by the council in March this year, saw that 72 per cent wanted the digital traffic light, while 16pc wanted the flashing yellow signals and 11pc wanted the traffic signals to remain the same.
Many of them are not needed and many could be used on a part-time basis as traffic is not constant, so for many hours in the day they cause more problems than if there were no traffic lights.