tragedian


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tragedian

(feminine), tragedienne
1. an actor who specializes in tragic roles
2. a writer of tragedy
References in classic literature ?
The picture of the tragedian stood enframed upon her desk.
The acme of bliss, which would have been a marriage with the tragedian, was not for her in this world.
But it was not long before the tragedian had gone to join the cavalry officer and the engaged young man and a few others; and Edna found herself face to face with the realities.
(being jealous) were on the side of the disappointed tragedian; so that the latter formed a little group about the redoubtable Mr Lenville, and the former looked on at a little distance in some trepidation and anxiety.
'But they shall not protect ye!' said the tragedian, taking an upward look at Nicholas, beginning at his boots and ending at the crown of his head, and then a downward one, beginning at the crown of his head, and ending at his boots--which two looks, as everybody knows, express defiance on the stage.
Thus urged, the tragedian adjusted the cuff of his right coat sleeve for the performance of the operation, and walked in a very stately manner up to Nicholas, who suffered him to approach to within the requisite distance, and then, without the smallest discomposure, knocked him down.
Before the discomfited tragedian could raise his head from the boards, Mrs Lenville (who, as has been before hinted, was in an interesting state) rushed from the rear rank of ladies, and uttering a piercing scream threw herself upon the body.
'Humbly and submissively,' returned the tragedian, scowling upwards.
Nevertheless, the tragedians and Pindar disobeying our behests, although they acknowledge that Asclepius was the son of Apollo, say also that he was bribed into healing a rich man who was at the point of death, and for this reason he was struck by lightning.
In his day he commanded a salary greater than a tragedian, earning between PS60-PS100 a week with Madame Vestris' company at the Olympic Theatre.
In the Persians by ancient Greek tragedian Aeschylus, Xerxes -- the king of Persia -- invites the gods' enmity for his hubristic expedition against Greece.
Great deeds never stay unnoticed, and as the ancient Greek tragedian Sophocles said, "To be doing good deeds is man's most glorious task." Viva Chicago Sinfonietta, your glorious tasks are greatly appreciated and enjoyed!