trail pheromone

trail pheromone

[′trāl ‚fer·ə‚mōn]
(physiology)
A type of pheromone used by social insects and some lepidopterans to recruit others of its species to a food source.
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In Nasutitermes corniger, two compounds have been isolated and identified as the trail pheromone, and the induced following behavior is only optimal under an adequate mixing (similar to the naturally deposited amounts) of the components (Sillam-Dusses et al., 2010).
(Z)dodec-3-en-1-ol, a novel termite trail pheromone identified after solid phase microextraction from Macrotermes annandalei.
(Z,E,E)-Dodecatrien-1-ol: a minor component of trail pheromone of termite Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki.
Identification of multicomponent trail pheromones in the most evolutionarily derived termites, the Nasutitermitinae (Termitidae).
alba can follow ant trails and suggested that the orientation cue used is predominantly olfactory, and methyl 4-methylpyrrole-2-carboxylate could be the major trail pheromone, although there could be a complex of pheromonal factors (Robertson et al.
Methyl 4-methylpyrrole-2-carboxylate: a volatile trail pheromone from the leaf-cutting ant Atta cephalotes.
In one experiment, scientists injected fire ant workers with their specific PBAN to see if this process influenced the biosynthesis of the trail pheromone. Results demonstrated that there was a significant increase in pheromone production after injection.
Having determined the sequence of the genes, Vander Meer and Choi used the relatively new technique of RNA interference (RNAi) to provide another test of the role PBAN plays in fire ant trail pheromone production.
While the above research was not directed at controlling fire ants, prevention of trail pheromone production could limit the ant's survival in terms of collecting resources, migration, and other activities, Vander Meer says.
The trail pheromone of the termite, Trinervitermes trinervoides.
It is often suggested that termites follow inks that mimic their natural trail pheromones. However, the connection between termite trail pheromones and artificially produced ballpoint inks is more elusive than simple demonstrations of the phenomenon would suggest.
The discovery has indicated that Argentine ants use more than just the simple trail pheromone to find their way.