transcendental term

transcendental term

[‚tran·sən¦den·təl ′tərm]
(mathematics)
In an expression, a term that cannot be expressed solely by numbers and algebraic symbols.
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The idea of "support" invokes the classic ground-grounded relation, immediately inviting further transcendental terms that now invade Agamben's account: "For in Kojeve's reading of Hegel, man is not a biologically defined species, nor is he a substance given once and for all; he is, rather, a field of dialectical tensions always already cut by internal caesurae that every time separate--at least virtually--'anthropophorous' animality and the humanity which takes bodily form in it." (25) Whereas on the surface this is indeed a disavowal of the kind of crude foundationalism that would simply posit ahistorical substances or biological substrates in a respective essentialism or biologism, it has in fact merely repeated the same kind of transcendental logic on a more subtle level.
While allusions to the story of Cain and Abel are examined in a number of poems in which sibling envy is the central theme, its treatment in the ensuing discussion regarding individuality and duality in transcendental terms is insightful, as is the discussion on the eventual cancellation of difference as a surprising consequence of rivalry, but I miss some mention of a differing approach, such as in "La intrusa," for instance, surely a paean to brotherly love.
Therefore, it is not necessary for the situation to imply clearly and explicitly the presence of an entity of a transcendental nature; indeed, such a presence could activate the interpretation by itself and obscure the type of relation that we are actually trying to analyze: between the centrality of the Quixoteism orientation and an interpretation in more transcendental terms. Precisely so as to avoid this problem we used a situation of need which, at least in its most obvious conception, involved just one individual, rather than entities of a more transcendental nature, such as society or the world.
Transcendental terms such as res or ens become mere commodities of language.
The Tibetan religion Campbell depicts is a quintessentially patriarchal one where "the appropriation of the female in transcendental terms" is accompanied by "the exclusion of the female in worldly terms." For the last five hundred years, Campbell points out, though the word "lama" is derived from "ma" meaning "mother" and literally means "soul mother," not one woman has been acknowledged as a teacher, and none is to be found in the hierarchy of power.
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