transfer admittance

transfer admittance

[′tranz·fər ad‚mit·əns]
(electronics)
An admittance rating for electron tubes and other transducers or networks; it is equal to the complex alternating component of current flowing to one terminal from its external termination, divided by the complex alternating component of the voltage applied to the adjacent terminal on the cathode or reference side; all other terminals have arbitrary external terminations.
References in periodicals archive ?
transfer impedance [Z.sub.t] and the transfer admittance [Y.sub.t] of the shield, which describe the processes by which a portion of the induced current and the induced charge on the shield find their way onto the internal wire, respectively.
At the frequencies of interest, the transfer impedance is much larger than the transfer admittance, and this is because the electric field shielding of the shield is much better than the magnetic field shielding, which means that the shield current is more important than the shield-to-ground voltage for the induced voltage of the load [R.sub.1].
The terms adjacent to the diagonal define the transfer admittance response of the transmission line that connects the two adjacent diodes.