transference


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transference

[tranz′fər·əns]
(psychology)
The unconscious transfer of the patient's feelings and reactions originally associated with important persons in the patient's life, usually father, mother, or siblings, toward others and in the analytic situation, toward the analyst.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because transference originated in a therapeutic setting, Freud and others initially described it in clinical terms, where the patient (or client) "superimposes childhood fantasies and conflicts onto a therapist" (Baum & Andersen, 1999, p.
If you have ever had an emotional reaction to someone which was clearly too intense for the situation, you have most likely experienced a transference reaction.
Transference — a magazine dedicated to poetry in translation — is published by the Department of World Languages and Literatures at Western Michigan University.
I have found that exploring historical material and transference manifestations of siblings (or other significant lateral figures or sibling substitutes) in addition to parents both complicates and enriches the therapeutic process.
In 1978, the theory of animal magnetism and energy transference of Mesmer was discredited by a committee commissioned by the government to investigate mesmerism.
Figure 2 shows the changes of the electronic transference number as functions of temperature for different slags, at CO/C[O.sub.2] = 1.
Evans (2007) explores the importance of transference in the nurse-patient relationship.
PTIs defeated candidate in the National Assembly (NA) constituency, Aleem Khan has himself stated in petition that he does not possess any evidence of votes transference, he added.
Thus the question of transference is coupled with counter-transference and the psychoanalysis is viewed as mutual, and reciprocal (although asymmetrical), of two individuals trying to primarily help one--the patient (Aron, 2001).
You must still draw back the string in the field--it's a transference of energy from body to bow.
The text eloquently examines four patient cases providing detailed insight into the unconscious collision between transference and countertransference forces.
Therefore, they can play role in the transference of electrical signals in brain cells (neurons).