transfusion

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Related to transfusion reaction: hemolytic transfusion reaction

transfusion

the injection of blood, blood plasma, etc., into the blood vessels of a patient
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

transfusion

[tranz′fyü·zhən]
(medicine)
The administration of blood, or one of its components, as a part of treatment.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
* The medical management of the transfusion reaction will depend on the type and severity of the reaction.
Table 1: Classification of blood with their transfusion significance in dogs DEA Old Natural Transfusion significance Group name antibody 1.1 [A.sub.1] No Clinically significant antibody-- can cause an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction 1.2 [A.sub.2] No Clinically significant antibody-- can cause an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction 3 B Yes Possible delayed reaction.
In Ireland, repeat aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures are performed 4 days after collection to extend platelet shelf life to 7 days; no septic transfusion reactions have been reported after >100,000 apheresis collections (3).
This ensures that pretransfusion compatibility tests are robust and reproducible, providing patients with the highest level of protection against harmful hemolytic transfusion reactions.
THA can result in high intraoperative EBL and the need for one or more blood transfusions, thus increasing the cost of hospital stay as well as the risk for transfusion reactions and other complications (Haspl et al., 2014).
Thirty-two transfusions (1%) resulted in a reported transfusion reaction. In the year prior to the study (2010), 4 (4.7%) of the participating institutions had a serious, nonfatal plasma-related transfusion reaction reported, and 5 (5.9%) had a fatal plasma-related transfusion reaction within the 5-year period before the study.
This large volume of blood product replacement places the client at great risk for transfusion reactions.
DEA 1.1 and 1.2 antibody-antigen interactions result in acute haemolytic transfusion reactions. DEA 3, 5 and 7 antibody-antigen interaction in vivo results in permanent red blood cell sequestration and loss in 3 to 5 days.
The inability to detect clinically significant antibodies could place patients at an increased risk for developing a hemolytic transfusion reaction. In addition, the weakening of reactivity with Technique #2 could lead to an increased incidence of unidentifiable nonspecific antibodies.
A DAT can detect immunotargeting of transfused RBCs before hemolysis is clinically evident, or it can confirm the presence of an alloantibody in suspected hemolytic transfusion reactions. In blood banking, one of the most common uses of the DAT is in investigating alloimmune-mediated delayed serologic transfusion reaction (DSTR) and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTRs) in the setting of transfusion-associated incompatibility.
Viral screening and nucleic acid testing remained the most common methods for detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B and C.1 But still, blood-transmitted infections like viruses, protozoans, helminths, prions and bacteria are some of the biggest problems of transfusion medicine.2 This concern becomes even more serious in the case of platelets as they are the particular component of the blood which is ideal for the growth of bacteria.3 Since 1990, several methods have been used to minimise the risk of bacterial transfusion reaction. Among these measures, donor screening and skin decontamination by iodine or chlorhexidine were important steps, as majority of bacteria isolated from blood bags had been skin flora.4

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