transfusion

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Related to transfusion therapy: exchange transfusion, blood component therapy

transfusion

the injection of blood, blood plasma, etc., into the blood vessels of a patient

transfusion

[tranz′fyü·zhən]
(medicine)
The administration of blood, or one of its components, as a part of treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coagulation factor levels in neurosurgical patients with mild prolongation of prothrombin time: effect on plasma transfusion therapy.
b) Children undergoing transfusion therapy shall be immunized against hepatitis B
In addition to establishing a protocol for implementing hydroxyurea therapy, the guideline addresses changes in pneumococcal vaccination recommendations for adults and children; annual transcranial Doppler screening coupled with long-term transfusion therapy when necessary to prevent stroke in children aged 2-16 years; rapid initiation of opioids for severe pain during vasoocclusive crises; analgesics and physical therapy for avascular necrosis; ACE inhibitor treatment for adults with microalbuminuria; referral to specialists for screening and treatment of proliferative retinopathy; echocardiography to assess signs of pulmonary hypertension; and monitoring for iron overload in patients receiving transfusion therapy.
The goal of modern transfusion therapy is to provide appropriate replacement therapy with blood components (red cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma, cryo-precipitate etc.
In addition, while transfused platelets do lot typically need to be immune-matched to patients, repeated transfusion of unmatched platelets leads to an immune reaction that eventually renders patients unresponsive to platelet transfusion therapy.
The objective of study was to assess the oxidative stress in recipients of chronic transfusion therapy.
He stressed that collection of 100% blood from non-paid voluntary donors and employment of properly trained staff in blood bank will further help in minimizing the adverse events associated with blood transfusion therapy.
This edition has been reorganized around sections on fundamental concepts; blood groups and serologic testing, including detection and identification of antibodies and pretransfusion testing; transfusion practice, with chapters on donor screening, component preparation, transfusion therapy, reactions, and apheresis, and discussion of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, autoimmune hemolytic anemias, and transfusion-transmitted diseases; leukocyte antigens and relationship testing; quality and compliance issues, with discussion of quality management, safety and federal regulatory requirements, laboratory information systems, and legal and ethical issues; and future trends.
Conclusion: The prevalence of TTV and HCV infection was higher in the Iranian thalassemia patients on chronic transfusion therapy than in the controls.
Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands), dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis).
Blood transfusion therapy must be considered in selected group of patients of TI after weighing benefits against the disadvantages.
It is also essential nurses understand the rationales for their actions in caring for patients undergoing transfusion therapy, to ensure the care is performed accurately and with critical attention to individual patient requirements.

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