transit survey

transit survey

[′trans·ət ′sər‚vā]
(engineering)
A ground surveying method in which a transit instrument is set up at a control point and oriented, and directions and distances to observed points are recorded.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Watson said: "Queen's has played a pivotal role in the development of the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) - the instrument that found the planet and after which the planet is named.
nearby) stars are the European Southern Observatory's Next-Generation Transit Survey, which recently achieved first light, and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), slated for launch in August 2017.
The Next-Generation Transit Survey will see them partner with astrophysicists across Europe in Chile.
Elsewhere at the conference, Coel Hellier of Keele University, U.K., was presenting 23 new giant planets found by the WASP-South transit survey. This South Africa-based project watches star fields across wide areas of the sky using off-the-shelf telephoto camera lenses.
The study complements earlier exoplanet surveys by counting planets between 10 and 100 AU, a range in which the Kepler Space Telescope transit survey and radial velocity observations are unlikely to detect planets.
They found the huge rogue planet in the Neptunian Desert using the state-of-the-art Next-Generation Transit Survey observing facility.
For the project, he used the Warwick-led Next-Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) telescope array at the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in Chile.
The researchers spotted the planet using the state-of-the-art Next-Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) - a wide-field observing facility made of a compact ensemble of telescopes, designed to search for transiting planets on bright stars - run by the Universities of Warwick, Leicester, Cambridge, Queen's University Belfast, Observatoire de Geneve, DLR Berlin and Universidad de Chile.
1 Resident and Worker Transit Survey, its analysis, and inventory of existing conditions
TESS Principal Investigator George Ricker, a senior research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, said that TESS will carry out the first spaceborne all-sky transit survey, covering 400 times as much sky as any previous mission.
He used the Warwick-led Next-Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) telescope array in Chile which is designed to find exoplanets by collecting brightness measurements of hundreds of thousands of stars and is based at the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory.

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