translate

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translate

[tran′slāt]
(computer science)
To convert computer information from one language to another, or to convert characters from one representation set to another, and by extension, the computer instruction which directs the latter conversion to be carried out.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

translate

(1) To change one language into another; for example, assemblers, compilers and interpreters translate source language into machine language.

(2) In computer graphics, to move an image on screen without rotating it.

(3) In telecommunications, to change the frequencies of a band of signals.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, as in the case of El and Baal, where etymology and its uses in other faiths were not the basis for the translatability of divine names in ancient Israel, the attempt to define the meaning of Allah in Indonesia by tracing its etymology and historical usage in other religions is not only unnecessary but also incorrect.
Rather than seeing the practices of the "restored humanity" as "suicide," the person who does not share the faith might find them completely "reasonable" due to "their paradigmatic accessibility to others and their translatability into other terms." These practices are "by nature 'lay' or 'public' phenomena" rather than esoteric "religious' or 'ritual' activities." Finally, the middle axioms themselves would have to go.
Sokefeld's view can also be related to the concepts of "positive" and "negative feedbacks" inherent in Wolfgang Iser's cybernetic model of cultural translatability (passim).
In other words, they represent a failure to promote First World feminism on a global scale, exposing the lack of translatability of Western feminism.
[7] suggest that differential translatability of Igf2 transcripts may explain this observation.
For example, the claim of the universal translatability of the English word justice is an extraordinarily presumptive one.
The credo of universal translatability implies a notion of universal verifiability.
By grouping the original and the remake as a "series" and observing how the audiences from different cultural contexts perceive the differences between the two versions of the film, the researcher can learn much about the differences as well as the translatability of these cultural products.
In addition to language, another issue related to translatability is culture-specific concepts.
Smith's goals in this book are threefold: first, to elaborate upon Jan Assmann's treatment of translatability of divinity in the ancient Near Eastern and Greco-Roman worlds; second, to challenge and overturn Assmann's idea that the biblical tradition completely lacks any notion of translatability of divinity (Assmann's "Mosiac Distinction")--a lynch pin, according to Smith, in Assmann's theory that Mosaic monotheism, in contrast to polytheism, is inherently intolerant and prone to violence; and third, to enrich our understanding of ancient authors' notions of deity as presented in the Hebrew Bible and other ancient Near Eastern texts.
When asked to comment on the translatability of the study findings to other states, Dr.
Christianity's global expansion has given rise, he continues, to numerous issues arising from "Christianity's inherent vernacularizing tendencies and its translatability; the dynamics of trans-cultural interactions within religiously plural settings; the multifaceted, frequently messy contextualization process; the initiatives of indigenous persons as well as groups; and, the momentous manner in which grassroots or mother tongue theologies are shaping, even revitalizing, twenty-first century Christianity" (ix).