transmission electron microscope


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transmission electron microscope

[tranz′mish·ən i′lek‚trän ′mī·krə‚skōp]
(electronics)
A type of electron microscope in which the specimen transmits an electron beam focused on it, image contrasts are formed by the scattering of electrons out of the beam, and various magnetic lenses perform functions analogous to those of ordinary lenses in a light microscope.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, modern transmission electron microscopes provide a number of complementary capabilities known as analytical electron microscopy (6).
When viewed under a transmission electron microscope, the fossils appear as a film coating the inside of cracks, a typical way for bacteria to grow.
The next major item to enhance Gilpin's lab will be the arrival of an FEI Tecnai G2 Spirit transmission electron microscope, which is capable of storing individual user settings to allow researchers to quickly reset the instrument to the precise conditions of an earlier experiment without lengthy human input.
Daulton and Ozima, however, analyzed the carburanium with a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, a much more sensitive method.
A transmission electron microscope revealed that the rubbery material consisted largely of interwoven buckytubes, all about 1.2 nanometers in diameter and with walls a single atomic layer thick.
Experimental Station in Wilmington, Del., for examination with a transmission electron microscope.
The LaB6 Transmission Electron Microscope is for high-resolution imaging and analytical applications in the fields of materials, none-electronics, and biological sciences.
With a transmission electron microscope, he discovered that those needlelike specks consist of nested graphite tubes.
That simple theory now faces a challenge from new images of the acid-treated, light-emitting silicon taken with a transmission electron microscope. "[Canham's] pillars are far too large for quantum confinement," says John M.

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