transmission-line theory

transmission-line theory

[tranz′mish·ən ¦līn ‚thē·ə·rē]
(electricity)
The application of electrical and electromagnetic theory to the behavior of transmission lines.
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to the transmission-line theory, the open-circuit condition will show at the two ends of the line through the half-wavelength transformation at each side.
New three-conductor transmission-line theory with coefficients of the potential The electromagnetic noise is usually a high-frequency wave, and we have to consider that all of the lines have electromagnetic functions for any real description of noise.
We can now extend the single-conductor transmission-line theory to a multiconductor transmission-line theory by extending the differential equations for each line, which are numbered as i = 1,2.
The principles of the circuit theory mentioned above are completely different from those of the conventional two-conductor transmission-line theory, which is based on the coefficients of the capacitance.
It combines circuit theory, transmission-line theory, method-of-moments algorithms, and complex matrix techniques.
It shows how to put Maxwell equations in the form of generalized telegrapher equations and how to arrive at the classical transmission-line theory.
Chapter 2 begins with transmission-line theory using rectangular waveguide, coaxial line and microstrip lines, and introduces the Smith chart and impedance matching techniques.
Therefore, the ordinary transmission-line theory is not applicable to nonparallel lines.
That is, the crosstalk analysis was performed by using an ordinary transmission-line theory because of weak-coupling assumption.
While few switching-system designers pay such close attention to grounding schemes, shielding, and isolation, even fewer consider the basics of transmission-line theory.
The result of implementing the best practices associated with separation of ground planes, careful attention to isolation and shielding, and a focus on transmission-line theory enables designers to develop switching systems with bandwidths typically five to 10 times greater than the majority of commercial switching systems available today.
RES]) can be found using elementary transmission-line theory.

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