transonic flight


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transonic flight

[tran′sän·ik ′flīt]
(aerospace engineering)
Flight of vehicles at speeds near the speed of sound (660 miles per hour or 1060 kilometers per hour, at 35,000 feet or 10,700 meters altitude), characterized by great increase in drag, decrease in lift at any altitude, and abrupt changes in the moments acting on the aircraft; the vehicle may shake or buffet.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To demonstrate the accuracy of the training data, [C.sub.1] and [C.sub.m] are predicted via the Kriging models under two flight conditions in a transonic flight regime, one with [M.sub.[infinity]] = 0.76 and [[alpha].sub.0] = 1 deg and the other with [M.sub.[infinity]] = 0.82 and [[alpha].sub.0] = 4 deg.
This occurs at sea level for low subsonic flight conditions and at cruise altitude for high subsonic flight conditions (transonic flight).
This maneuver feels like a rapid fall in an elevator; its purpose is to decrease the lift and associated drag developed by the airplane, allowing it quickly to transit the transonic flight region between Mach 1.0 and Mach 1.3, where shock waves developing on the airframe severely impede acceleration.
For supersonic aircraft, the large nozzle-exit-area needed for efficient supersonic cruise penalizes the design at subsonic and transonic flight conditions.