transposon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to transposon: insertion sequence

transposon

[¦tranz′pō‚zän]
(genetics)
A genetic element which comprises large discrete segments of deoxyribonucleic acid and is capable of moving from one chromosomal site to another in the same organism or in a different organism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transposable elements or transposons are a major source of genome modification and transfer of genes to other organisms (2).
Mutator transposons, the most active found in any known organism, should in theory be constantly mutating, weakening the race and leading to its demise.
These proteins were also found to be essential for silencing the transposons. The mechanism through which PIWI proteins promote gene silencing was not known until 2006 when Saito et al.
The acquisition gives Immusoft a license to use the Sleeping Beauty Transposon System for MPS I, and license options for hemophilia and inherited lysosomal storage disorders.
"I wanted to figure out a way to label blood cells inside of the body, and the best idea I had was to use mobile genetic elements called transposons."
But transposon transcripts do not have a free ride.
(23) Indeed, some authors have shown that erythromycin resistance determinants are carried by conjugative transposons, which are easily self-transferable and commonly found among S.
The transposon system results in fluorescence-tagged mutant chromosomes, opening the door to an array of new genetic screens that are difficult or impossible to conduct using more traditional mutagenesis methods, such as chemical or retroviral insertion.
These facilitate rapid adaptation to new transient environmental selection pressure, are typically located on mobile genetic elements such as genomic islands, conjugative transposons, mobilized transposons and plasmids as well.
The details of vancomycin resistance have been best documented with the vanA gene cluster found on the transposon, or "jumping" genetic element, Tn1546 (36).
In the early 1980s, knowing nothing about the function of resistance genes, and, not wanting to make assumptions, Pryor and his colleagues decided they would use transposon tagging to see if they could knock out a resistance gene in a model plant, flax (see story on page 29).

Full browser ?