transubstantiation


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Related to transubstantiation: consubstantiation

transubstantiation:

see EucharistEucharist
[Gr.,=thanksgiving], Christian sacrament that repeats the action of Jesus at his last supper with his disciples, when he gave them bread, saying, "This is my body," and wine, saying, "This is my blood." (Mat. 26; Mark 14; Luke 22; 1 Cor. 11.
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transubstantiation

changing of bread to body of Christ. [Christian Theol.: Brewer Dictionary, 1097]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

transubstantiation

(esp in Roman Catholic theology)
a. the doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist
b. the mystical process by which this is believed to take place during consecration
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
She traces the references to alchemy and transubstantiation in Donne's secular poems and argues that these poems present a point of view that "disclaims either substantial theological commitment or significant scientific engagement" (71).
Leenhardt, a Calvinist who wanted to use the term "transubstantiation," though under the premise that substance is coterminous with divine intention.
Smiling, she informs him that she doubts that she receives "Goddys body" because "For pou callest Goddys body pat I made wyth myne owne handes." (38) Gregory has the people pray for a miracle to convince Lasyna of transubstantiation, and when he returns to the altar, he finds "pe ost turnyd into raw flesse bledyng." (39) Seeing the bleeding flesh, Lasyna cries, "Lorde, now I leve pat pou arte Criste, Goddys Sone of heven, in forme of bredde." (40) Gregory has the people pray so that the Host "turnyn a3eyn into lyknes of bredde, and so [it] dydde," and he then housels Lasyna with the Host.
While language thus serves as the vehicle for the protagonists' dissent (and descent), it also enables their reconciliation: the Croxton Play aligns the transformative power of the consecratory words with the transformative power of believers' confessions of faith, wherein both enact a transubstantiation and make manifest the real presence of Christ.
Barden addresses Turner's concern directly by making clear that transubstantiation is not mechanical but metaphysical, accessible to all who can distinguish between a substance and its accidents.
1548) polemic could be both comic and dramatic: in this colloquial dialogue the voices of the interlocutors are entirely distinct and John Bon's witty facetiousness is an amusing veil for a ferocious attack on transubstantiation. Zlatar argues that for these writers "fictionality constitutes the 'delight' of the form and was consciously deployed to sugar the pill of edification and so mobilize the will to reform.
does not seem persuasive enough for Early Modern English speakers, even more if we consider that parts of the content of the original text have been, in the 20th c., matter of debate for asserting, denying or reinterpreting transubstantiation (see for example: Thurston 1907; Leinbaugh 1982 or Grundy 1991).
Neither transubstantiation nor the inability of women to be ordained meets this high standard.
After the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215, theologians were required to use the term 'transubstantiation' of the Eucharistic conversion and Christ's real presence (138), but there was considerable flexibility in its explanation.
the particular terminology of transubstantiation had not yet been created.
The Roman Catholic Church defines the effect of the Eucharist as "transubstantiation." This means they believe that although the properties of the blessed elements remain bread and wine, their substance become the substance of Jesus' flesh and blood.
In the context of the raging debates between those represented by Sir Thomas More and the English reformation, the author discusses Firth's writings in his final year, notably "The Articles Wherefore John Firth Died," in which he asserts his theology of doctrinal adiaphora, i.e., that certain dogmas (notably, purgatory and transubstantiation) are not an essential part of Christian faith because they are neither commanded nor forbidden in the Bible.