Neuroma

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neuroma

[nu̇′rō·mə]
(medicine)
A tumor of the nervous system.

Neuroma

 

a collective term designating several oncological conditions of the nervous system. Included as neuromas are neurinomas, neurofibromas, and neuroblastomas.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Traumatic neuroma in a breast cancer patient after modified radical mastectomy: A case report.
FNA results were inconclusive, and core biopsy yielded the result of traumatic neuromas.
A reactive proliferation rather than a true neoplasm, traumatic neuroma can arise secondary to trauma to a nerve bundle.
Traumatic neuroma of the mandible: A case report with spontaneous remission.
The role of high-resolution ultrasound in the diagnosis of a traumatic neuroma in an injured median nerve.
In 100% of the cases of traumatic neuroma, schwann cells within the nerve fascicles were immunoreactive toward S-100.
Histologic examination revealed that the mass was made up of two separate and adjacent lesions: (1) a traumatic neuroma that was characterized by distorted neural structures embedded in fibrous tissue and (2) an arteriovenous aneurysm that featured a predominance of arteriole-like vessels (figure 1).
Traumatic neuroma of the common hepatic duct after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Traumatic neuroma in wall of recurrent unicystic ameloblastoma: A case report.
We believe that the tumor described in this report and those labeled granular cell traumatic neuroma by Rosso et al are really the same lesion, with the difference that in this patient the persistent tissular injury in the vicinity of lithiasis played the role of a causal, causative, or promoting factor for the development of the tumor, in a similar way, for example, that Morton neuroma is a mechanically induced lesion that affects women who frequently wear shoes that are not designed for the physiology of the foot.
Traumatic neuromas usually follow an injury and have an irregular disorganized architecture consisting of a proliferation of individual nerve fascicles separated by a fibrotic, sometimes inflamed, stroma.