treason

(redirected from treasons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

treason,

legal term for various acts of disloyalty. The English law, first clearly stated in the Statute of Treasons (1350), originally distinguished high treason from petit (or petty) treason. Petit treason was the murder of one's lawful superior, e.g., murder of his master by an apprentice. High treason constituted a serious threat to the stability or continuity of the state. It included attempts to kill the king, the queen, or the heir apparent or to restrain their liberty; to counterfeit coinage or the royal seal; and to wage war against the kingdom. Especially cruel methods were used in executing traitors. Court decisions developed the English law of treason into an instrument for suppressing resistance to governmental policy. Any degree of violence in expressing opposition to parliamentary enactments was held to be a levy of war and a threat to the king's life. In the 19th cent., the English law was reformed; petit treason was abolished, cruel methods of executing traitors were forbidden, and many types of treason (e.g., counterfeiting) were made felonies that involved a lesser penalty than death. To avoid the abuses of the English law, treason was specifically defined in the U.S. Constitution (definitions of other crimes were not deemed necessary). Article 3 of the Constitution thus provides that treason shall consist only in levying war against the United States or in giving aid and comfort to its enemies and that conviction may be had only on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act or on confession in open court. There have been fewer than 40 federal prosecutions for treason and even fewer convictions. Several men were convicted of treason in connection with the Whiskey Rebellion (1794) but were pardoned by George Washington. The most famous treason trial, that of Aaron BurrBurr, Aaron,
1756–1836, American political leader, b. Newark, N.J., grad. College of New Jersey (now Princeton). Political Career

A brilliant law student, Burr interrupted his study to serve in the American Revolution and proved himself a valiant soldier in
..... Click the link for more information.
 in 1807, resulted in acquittal. Politically motivated attempts to convict opponents of the Jeffersonian Embargo Acts and the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 all failed. In the 20th cent., treason became largely a wartime phenomenon, and the treason cases of World Wars I and II were of minor significance. Most states have provisions in their constitutions or statutes similar to those in the U.S. Constitution. There have been only two successful prosecutions for treason on the state level, that of Thomas Dorr in Rhode Island and that of John Brown in Virginia.

Bibliography

See M. Boveri, Treason in the Twentieth Century (tr. 1961); J. W. Hurst, The Law of Treason in the United States (1971); C. Pincher, Traitors (1987).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Treason

See also Treachery.
Arnold, Benedict
(1741–1801) American Revolutionary general who plotted surrender of West Point to British. [Am. Hist.: Benét, 52]
Burgundy, Duke of
fights for English, then joins French. [Br. Lit.: I Henry VI]
Carne, Caryl
traitor to country. [Br. Lit.: Springhaven]
Christian, Colonel William
executed for treason. [Br. Lit.: Peveril of the Peak, Walsh Modern, 96]
Edmund
“a most toad-spotted traitor.” [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
Nolan, Philip
deserts the U.S. Army to join Burr’s conspiracy. [Am. Lit.: Hale The Man Without a Country in Magill I, 553]
Quisling, Vidkun
(1887–1945) Norwegian fascist leader; persuaded Hitler to attack Norway. [Nor. Hist.: Flexner, 444]
Vichy
seat of collaborationist government after German occupation (1941). [Fr. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1128]
Wallenstein, Count
powerful German general in Thirty Years’ War who corresponded with the Swedish enemy. [Ger. Drama: Schiller Wallenstein in Magill II, 1119]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

treason

violation or betrayal of the allegiance that a person owes his sovereign or his country, esp by attempting to overthrow the government; high treason
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
They argued that they had committed treason by aiding the Confederacy and thereby were subject to the presidential pardon that had been issued for all Civil War treasons.
1, 24 ("[The Framers] wrote into the organic act of the new government a prohibition of legislative or judicial creation of new treasons. And a venerable safeguard against false testimony was given a novel application by requiring two witnesses to the same overt act.").
The Manual's choice of phrasing is interesting and raises the question of whether "waging war" is intended to be coterminous with the treason prong of "levying war" or whether "waging war" for Guidelines purposes could also encompass certain types of "aid and comfort" treasons.
They wrote into the organic act of the new government a prohibition of legislative or judicial creation of new treasons. And a venerable safeguard against false testimony was given a novel application by requiring two witnesses to the same overt act.
The elimination of compassing-thought treasons in the United States takes the wind out of Fletcher's sails by ruling out the historic category of cases that would have been most likely to violate the harm principle.
Finally, treason might clarify the procedural system under which some terrorist acts should be addressed and in the process satisfy those with divergent views about the appropriate framework for handling terrorism.
The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood,
(3) </pre> <p>The Treason Clause, by its very terms, complicates both the liberal and conservative positions.
The Treason Clause is one of the great forgotten clauses of the Constitution, and many well-trained lawyers might be surprised to learn that it even exists.
This Article seeks to place the Treason Clause at the heart of our thinking about the constitutional issues raised by the "war on terror," with particular emphasis on the "enemy combatant" issue.
From at least the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries, English and American treatise writers, public officials, and courts consistently distinguished between persons subject to the law of treason and persons subject to military authority.
This key distinction between civil and military authority, which lay at the heart of Anglo-American treason law, regrettably did not survive World War II.