treasure-trove


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

treasure-trove,

in English law, buried or concealed money or precious metals without any ascertainable owner. Such property belongs to the crown. The present practice in Great Britain is for the crown to pay the finder for the treasure-trove if it is of historic or artistic value. In the United States the government does not assert a claim to apparently ownerless property but allows the finder to keep it.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

treasure-trove

in Britain
Law valuable articles, such as coins, bullion, etc., found hidden in the earth or elsewhere and of unknown ownership. Such articles become the property of the Crown, which compensates the finder if the treasure is declared. In 1996 treasure was defined as any item over 300 years old and containing more than 5% precious metal
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Warwickshire coroner Michael Coker will now hold a treasure-trove hearing to decide whether Mr Chester can keep the valuables.
Indeed, Mouchel's notes and annotated bibliography are a treasure-trove of details, quotations, and summaries of the ideas of these minor authors.
Catalogs offer a treasure-trove of useful and inexpensive gadgets like talking watches and calculators, large-button remote controls and telephones, writing guides, and kitchen gadgets.
Voyager 2's precicous treasure-trove of pictures of Miranda numbers barely a dozen frames (many of which have been combined into the preliminary photomosaic above), but they are more than enough to provide clear evience of Miranda's exciting -- and mystifying -- past.