treble clef


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treble clef

Music the clef that establishes G a fifth above middle C as being on the second line of the staff.
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(Downward transposition was not at all uncommon when countertenor solos were issued in print: for instance, |I envy not the pride of May,' from Purcell's 1693 birthday ode for Queen Mary, is in E major in the original and also goes to top [flat] [prime] [natural], but it was published, in the treble clef, in D major.)(26) On the other hand, if Coridon and Mopsa had originally been written in F major, for a soprano, it could perfectly well have been left in that key for Pate to sing (an octave lower, of course), because it would go no lower than f.
The examples shown are mostly in the treble clef throughout the book.
It is an attractive eight-minute, three movement (fast, slow, fast) duet of rhythmically independent equals, both in treble clef and the same tessitura (mostly on the staff), often crossing voices.
For example, in measure 2 illustrated in Example 5, Capers uses major (F major chord, bass clef) and augmented (E-flat augmented, treble clef) chords; in measure 5, shown in Example 6, she utilizes minor (D minor, bass clef) and major (C major, treble clef) chords; in measure 13, labeled Example 7, Capers uses two minor chords, A-minor (bass clef) and E-minor (treble clef) for her polytonal and extended harmonies.
6, where a d" appears instead of a c" as the first note in the treble clef.)
The parts are all fairly accessible; all four parts are written in treble clef, and none stretches beyond a two-octave range.
Both voice parts are written in treble clef, though they were originally sung by men.
As Durr indicates, this notation was unusual, since basses such as Johann Michael Vogl were quite accustomed to reading their parts from a treble clef. Durr speculates that Schubert composed these songs with specific singers in mind, including Vogl, Count Johann Karl Esterhazy, and the famous Italian bass Luigi Lablache.
When I realized, through working with Dale Clevenger, that my embouchure did not have the ability to play much below the treble clef, Bach's Suites became a great vehicle (along with Kopprasch and Singer) for opening up my low register and solidifying my embouchure change.
This piece requires careful attention to the dynamic pacing of the melodic line as it moves from bass to treble clef. "Sleigh Ride" features an ongoing staccato eighth-note rhythm that suggests bells throughout the piece.
One, however, the "transposing treble clef," is counterintuitive to read and often obscures the musical sense.
The overall range for the quartet is E[flat]-c[flat]", and the three top parts split the upper workload relatively evenly, while the fourth spends most of its time below the treble clef. This is more than just a transcription, however, and the close harmonies and intricacies of the rhythms, while they look innocent enough, will require some special attention, especially if the piece is to push and pull as it should.