Lavatera

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Related to tree mallow: Lavatera, Lavatera arborea

Lavatera

 

(tree mallow), a genus of herbs, shrubs, and, less commonly, trees of the family Malvaceae. The leaves are deeply lobed. The flowers, which are on pedicels, are solitary, axial, or in terminal racemose or spicate inflorescences. The epicalyx consists of several bractlets that are concresced at the base. The corolla is pink, purple, or, less commonly, yellow. The fruits, which are small, monospermous, and indehiscent, are arranged in a regular circle.

There are about 25 species, distributed mainly in the Mediterranean region. The USSR has three species. L. thuringiaca has large pink flowers in a loose raceme; it is found in the southern part of the forest zone, in the forest-steppe zone, in the steppe zone, and—less commonly—in the mountains. L. trimestris, an annual reaching 100 cm in height, has large (up to 6 cm across) pink (of various shades) or white flowers. Certain shrubby and arborescent forms are cultivated in greenhouses.

References in periodicals archive ?
Keep in mind that California tree mallow is not known for its longevity and probably will not live more than 10 years.
We got a big bunch of volunteers to Craigleith, trimmed all the tree mallow back with loppers and Hoovered up all the seedlings.
Tree mallow grows so densely, it becomes impossible for puffins to burrow into the ground and make their nests.
Tree mallow can grow to three metres tall, with purple flowers.
Volunteers have already begun the removal of the tree mallow on the neighbouring island of Fidra where it has invaded the natural vegetation.
THREAT: Puffin habitat is being damaged by tree mallow, right
Q: I ordered six tree mallows (Lavatera) from a catalog last year.
A: Tree mallows are highly suited to our climate as long as they are given excellent light and good drainage.
Hollyhocks are the main host, but it can affect Tree Mallows too.
Tree mallows (Lavatera), some native to the Mediterranean and some native to California, quickly grow to 8 or 10 feet, bloom like crazy for five to seven years or so and then suddenly die; just as these drought-tolerant plants become maintenance headaches, they die.
But try placing a few euryops plants in a garden of sages, lavenders, artemisias, penstemons and tree mallows.