Triage

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triage

[trē′äzh]
(medicine)
The process of determining which casualties (as from an accident, disaster, military battle, or explosion of nuclear weapons) need urgent treatment, which ones are well enough to go untreated, and which ones are beyond hope of benefit from treatment.

Triage

 

in medieval France the right and custom of lords to allot to themselves a portion of the common lands, usually one-third. Triage, widely practiced in the 18th century, was abolished by the French Revolution.

References in periodicals archive ?
Significantly fewer compliant healthdirect patients were triaged as ATS 5 (medical attention within 120 minutes) (7.8 percent, 95 percent CI 7.6 to 7.9 percent), compared to general NSW ED attendants (16.9 percent, 95 percent CI 16.9 to 17.0 percent).
The positive predictive value was the proportion of patients admitted to hospital among those who were triaged to the high triage priority, and the negative predictive value was the proportion of patients not being admitted among those who were triaged to the low triage priority.
triage practice is that claimants on a triaged resource axe rarely
Patients triaged to this level of care are likely to have failed previous treatments and may have a history of hospitalization for mental health problems.
The MROE direct that EPW are triaged and receive medical and nursing care equivalent to that provided to an American soldier.
On Monday, May 20, the time of a national casualty watch, just over 65 per cent of patients - 19 out of 29 - were triaged in the Patient's Charter standard time of 15 minutes.
Can cervical cytology specimens be triaged by testing for oncogenic strains of human papilloma virus?
Once triaged, 'red' and 'orange' patients were seen by the MSF team (a national doctor, three nurses and an expatriate doctor) in the resuscitation room, while 'yellow' and 'green' patients were seen by the national casualty medical officers in a room adjacent to the ED.
This study aimed to validate the revised version of the paediatric SATS for children triaged in six different ECs and answer the question as to whether an age-appropriate TEWS in addition to clinical discriminators improves the sensitivity of identifying a sick child requiring admission versus using clinical discriminators or a TEWS independently.
The woman had been subjectively triaged as 'stable', given the 'usual cocktail' of drugs and put in a corner of an observation 'ward' where 20 women with attendant families shared five beds and a scattering of chairs.
Exclusion criteria included children under 12 years (for whom a child/infant SATS system exists), those 'seen and treated' rather than formally triaged, and those admitted directly to the resuscitation bay or high-dependency unit (HDU) areas.