trichloronitromethane

trichloronitromethane

[trī¦klȯr·ō¦nī·trō′meth‚ān]
(inorganic chemistry)
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References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of this phaseout, which began in 2001, the use of alternative fumigants such as 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (trichloronitromethane) has increased (CDPR 2009).
Of the HNMs, trichloronitromethane ([Cl.sub.3]CN[O.sub.2], chloropicrin, TCNM) is the most common, being formed in disinfected waters containing nitrite [9-11].
Absolute rate constants for the free-radical-induced degradation of trichloronitromethane were determined using electron pulse radiolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy.
Bader, "The formation of trichloronitromethane (chloropicrin) and chloroform in a combined ozonation/chlorination treatment of drinking water," Water Research, vol.
Arnold, "Degradation of trichloronitromethane by iron water main corrosion products," Water Research, vol.
Arnold, "Effects of dissolved oxygen and iron aging on the reduction of trichloronitromethane, trichloracetonitrile, and trichloropropanone," Chemosphere, vol.
(1) These DBPs include trihalomethanes (such as chloroform), haloacetic acids and other compounds including haloketones, trichloroaldehydes, trichloronitromethane, and cyanogen chloride.
For many years, two liquid fumigants (trichloronitromethane and sodium n-methyl dithiocarbamate [NaMDC]) were the most commonly used chemicals for this application; however, concerns about spills and volatility led to a search for more easily handled fumigants.
([dagger]) Also called nitrochloroform, and trichloromethane, and trichloronitromethane.