trick

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trick

Cards
a. a batch of cards containing one from each player, usually played in turn and won by the player or side that plays the card with the highest value
b. a card that can potentially win a trick
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the short attention to such subjects as animal love, shame, trickiness, altruism, fear and regret, Wohlleben packs each chapter with stories and, where it exists, scientific evidence, so the reader feels nearly sated.
The trickiness of building and understanding a machine-learning algorithm and the great potential worth of its output are reflected in the response this kind of research receives.
but the reason, I suspect, that [basketball] appeals to the Hebrew with his Oriental background is that the game places a premium on an alert, scheming mind and flashy trickiness, artful dodging, and general smart-aleckness..."
Rugani, Caldara and Romagnoli are good, and there is also the trickiness from Romana Cagliari." Bonucci highlighted Italy's strongest points, saying, "In midfield there are Pellegrini and Verrati; in attack, Insigne and Belotti.
(56) But the relative sophistication and effectiveness of the device, and the trickiness of making TATP, points to the possibility of at least some bomb-making training or practice overseas.
In experiment a container with water was used and different trickiness layers of oil products using 6 small transparent plastic rings were formed.
The quality strategy involved evaluating the item in terms of the wording, image quality, or perceived "trickiness" of the item.
At the same time, they expressed concern about the disengaging nature of the presentations, the trickiness of quiz items, and the simplicity of material.
He added: "I'm so confident in my punching power and trickiness, and you're going to see that in every round, from the first four and then all the way through to the end."
The implications of this are twofold: firstly, a problematization of the relationship between modernist literature and magic, since the former valorizes an interiorized individuation that the surface trickiness of stage magic cannot approximate; and secondly, a devaluation of magic as artistry.