tridentate ligand

tridentate ligand

[trī′den‚tāt ′līg·ənd]
(inorganic chemistry)
A chelating agent having three groups capable of attachment to a metal ion. Also known as terdentate ligand.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other characterization studies showed that substituted bipyridine acted as a tridentate ligand, with two pyridine N and one carboxylic O atom as binding sites per ligand molecule.
3-(2-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)hydrazono)indolin-2-one, acted as a tridentate ligand and coordinated through phenolic oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and carbonyl group.
From the IR data in Table 7, it was analyzed that L1 acts as a tridentate ligand by coordinating through -O of the deprotonated phenolic group, -O of another deprotonated -OH group formed due to enolization, and -N of the azomethine group.
Tyrosine is a potentially tridentate ligand but it coordinates only through the carboxylato oxygen.
This study shows that synthesized Schiff base (BHMQMHI) acts as tridentate ligand coordinating to metal ion through azomethine nitrogen, carbonyl oxygen, and phenolic oxygen atom via deprotonation.
Early examples of metallic grids employed different bidentate and tridentate ligands based on bi(pyridines) (Youinou, et al., 1992) and terpyridines (Garcia, et al., 1999).
These substances that have been synthesized by our group incorporate heterocyclic bidentate (N[conjunction]N) and tridentate ligands (N[conjunction]N[conjunction]N) with or without carboxylic acid ancillary functionalities displaying typical octahedral coordination geometries as the majority of ruthenium(II) coordination compounds (structurally related compounds).
Depending on the pH and metal atom, amino acids can act as monodentate, bidentate and tridentate ligands and they can be either bridging or non- bridging ligands [17-19].