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point

1. short for vowel point
2. a pin, needle, or other object having such a point
3. Maths
a. a geometric element having no dimensions and whose position in space is located by means of its coordinates
b. a location
4. a promontory, usually smaller than a cape
5. a distinctive characteristic or quality of an animal, esp one used as a standard in judging livestock
6. any of the extremities, such as the tail, ears, or feet, of a domestic animal
7. Ballet the tip of the toes
8. Australian Rules football an informal name for behind
9. Navigation
a. one of the 32 marks on the circumference of a compass card indicating direction
b. the angle of 11°15ʹ between two adjacent marks
c. a point on the horizon indicated by such a mark
10. Cricket
a. a fielding position at right angles to the batsman on the off side and relatively near the pitch
b. a fielder in this position
11. any of the numbers cast in the first throw in craps with which one neither wins nor loses by throwing them: 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10
12. either of the two electrical contacts that make or break the current flow in the distributor of an internal-combustion engine
13. Brit a junction of railway tracks in which a pair of rails can be moved so that a train can be directed onto either of two lines
14. a piece of ribbon, cord, etc., with metal tags at the end: used during the 16th and 17th centuries to fasten clothing
15. Backgammon a place or position on the board
16. Brit
a. short for power point
b. an informal name for socket
17. the position of the body of a pointer or setter when it discovers game
18. Boxing a mark awarded for a scoring blow, knockdown, etc.
19. Ice hockey the position just inside the opponents' blue line

Point

The smallest unit in a composition, depending on the scale of the work; it may be composed of straight lines and arcs, forms (flowing and curvilinear), or a combination.

Point

 

a feature of an animal’s physical qualities used in evaluating an animal’s body conformation, breed traits, age, sexual development, health, productivity or performance, and breeding value. The points of an animal are considered collectively and in relation to one another. Different points are distinguished for different animal species and for the evaluation of different forms of productivity. A general evaluation is reached by adding up the points.

Figure 1. Principal points of a horse: (1) head, (2) neck, (3) wither, (4) shoulder, (5) point of shoulder, (6) forearm, (7) knee, (8) cannon, (9) pastern, (10) coronet, (11) fetlock, (12) thorax (ribs), (13) thigh, (14) back, (15) loin, (16) croup, (17) hoof, (18) stifle, (19) gaskin, (20) point of hock, and (21) metatarsus

The principal points of a horse are shown in Figure 1.


Point

 

a fundamental concept in geometry. In systematic expositions of geometry, the point is usually regarded as one of the primitive concepts. In modern mathematics the elements of various spaces are called points. In n-dimensional Euclidean space, for example, a point is an ordered set of n numbers. The points of different spaces may be of a very different nature.

Points having special names are encountered in many areas of mathematics. In geometry, for example, the singular points of curves may be studied. Such points include cusps, isolated points, points of inflection, natural boundary points, nodes, points of osculation, and corner points. Mathematical analysis deals with such singular points as critical points of differential equations and singularities of analytic functions. In set theory, a number of points characterizing the properties of a given set have received special names—for example, limit points, density points, and boundary points.

point

[pȯint]
(geography)
A tapering piece of land projecting into a body of water; it is generally less prominent than a cape.
(graphic arts)
A printer's unit of measurement, equivalent to 0.013837 inch (approximately ¹⁄₇₂ inch) or ¹⁄₁₂ pica; six lines of 12-point type measure 1 inch. Also known as printer's point; typography point.
(lapidary)
A unit of mass, used in measuring precious stones, equal to 0.01 metric carat, or to 2 milligrams.
(mathematics)
An element in a topological space.
One of the basic undefined elements of geometry possessing position but no nonzero dimension.
In positional notation, the character or the location of an implied symbol that separates the integral part of a numerical expression from its fractional part; for example, it is called the binary point in binary notation and the decimal point in decimal notation.
(navigation)
In marine operation, one thirty-second of a circle, or 11¼ degrees.

point

2. A mason’s tool; See wasting.
3.See pointing.

point

1. <unit, text> (Sometimes abbreviated "pt") The unit of length used in typography to specify text character height, rule width, and other small measurements.

There are six slightly different definitions: Truchet point, Didot point, ATA point, TeX point, Postscript point, and IN point.

In Europe, the most commonly used is Didot and in the US, the formerly standard ATA point has essentially been replaced by the PostScript point due to the demise of traditional typesetting systems and rise of desktop computer based systems running software such as QuarkXPress, Adobe InDesign and Adobe Pagemaker.

There are 20 twips in a point and 12 points in a pica (known as a "Cicero" in the Didot system).

Different point systems.

point

(1) To move the cursor (pointer) onto a line or image on screen by rolling a mouse across the desk or by pressing the Arrow keys.

(2) In typography, a unit equal to 1/72nd of an inch. Points are used to measure the vertical height of a printed character. See typeface.
References in periodicals archive ?
Low back pain is most often associated with quadratus lumborum muscle Trigger Points (TPs), often with an accompanying lumbar multifidi and superficial paraspinal muscle TPs.
Thermal ultrasound decreases tissue stiffness of trigger points in upper trapezius muscles.
Recent Canadian Fibromyalgia Guidelines discuss trigger point injections in the section on "off-label" medications, stating that they "may have some place in treatment of fibromyalgia.
Blunt needles that did not penetrate the skin, were pretended to be inserted over the chosen trigger point sites, and their removal was simulated after 10 minutes.
Sustained contractile activity leading to increased metabolic stress and reduced blood flow is likely the foci for secondary changes that contribute to the persistence of the myofascial trigger point.
Anyone who has rubbed his shoulder and found an "ouch" there has most likely stumbled on a trigger point.
The trigger point in an FSA refers to the commitment to supply certain volume of coal to consumers - a fixed percentage of the committed volume as per the agreements.
DUST MITES living in your mattress can be a trigger point for asthma.
Rather than it being an automatic breach when a rider uses the whip eight times on the Flat and nine times over jumps, the figures become the trigger point for a stewards' review.
THE BHA said yesterday it was happy with the trigger point for the reopening of races despite the delay in publishing entries for two of Sandown's feature races this weekend.