trigger pull

trigger pull

[′trig·ər ‚pu̇l]
(mechanics)
Resistance offered by the trigger of a rifle or other weapon; force which must be exerted to pull the trigger.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trigger pull gauges deliver the same sort of thing.
As we have done in the past, we scored crossbows based on portability, trigger pull, accuracy, ergonomics, and velocity.
Not long ago, there was a debate in "Reader Blowback" regarding the use of "trigger press" or "trigger pull." I would like to interject a simple truth.
The trigger pull is set between 1.5-2 pounds from the factory with no creep.
Its practical accuracy is hindered by its trigger pull. What I mean by this is that unless you're locking your pistol in a Ransom Rest before firing, a heavy trigger pull will make precise shooting difficult if not nearly impossible for most people.
Trigger pull was usually right at the advertised 6.5 pounds.
A theory on the gun-related Internet says "good" trigger pull equals "light" trigger pull.
Glock was invented to replace the revolver which has no external safety mechanism; its safety is on the long trigger pull.
In the past, some airguns have attempted to duplicate the look of real firearms, but they have fallen short in three areas: weight, trigger pull, and sights.
The first is trigger pull, the second is the sight radius.
Trigger pull averaged 4 pounds, 13.9 ounces, with a variation of only 1.5 ounces, and was one of the smoothest I've ever experienced on a shotgun.
* Smooth trigger pull for providing no-kickback during spraying