trillion

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trillion

1. the number represented as one followed by twelve zeros (1012); a million million
2. (formerly, in Britain) the number represented as one followed by eighteen zeros (1018); a million million million

trillion

[′tril·yən]
(mathematics)
The number 1012.
In British and German usage, the number 1018.

trillion

(mathematics)
In Britain, France, and Germany, 10^18 or a million cubed.

In the USA and Canada, 10^12.

trillion

One thousand billions, or 1 followed by 12 zeros (10 to the 12th power). In long scale usage, trillion refers to a million billions, or 1 followed by 18 zeros (10 to the 18th power). See space/time and long scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
The whole process, in real time takes one trillionth of a second.
"Combined with theoretical calculations, these data show how the light pulses generate wrinkles that have large amplitudes -- more than 15 percent of the layer's thickness -- and develop extremely quickly, in about a trillionth of a second.
Experiments suggest their device could sense a few trillionths of a gram of RDX.
IBM has created the world's fastest semiconductor circuit, operating at speeds of over 110 GigaHertz (GHz) and processing an electrical signal in 4.3 trillionths of a second.
The device can turn a single pulse of laser light into a rapid-fire burst of 21 pulses, each separated by 2 trillionths of a second.
The researchers found that the cooling process finished in just a few trillionths of a second.
According to Black Box, the GPS Network Time Server is very accurate - to within 50ns or 50 trillionths of a second.
The American physicist Luis Walter Alvarez (1911-1988) constructed huge bubble chambers and, beginning in 1960, detected particles that existed for only a few trillionths of a trillionth of a second before breaking down.
Further, with each pulse lasting only 30 trillionths of a second, or a hundred-millionth the time necessary to activate a pain nerve, no anesthesia is required.
It is now widely accepted that the universe emerged about 13.8 billion years ago in a phenomenon we now call the Big Bang. Our current model of the universe's formation tells us that it underwent a brief period of exponential expansion trillionths of trillionths of a second after the Big Bang - a phenomenon called "cosmic inflation." During this period, space-time burgeoned from being smaller than a proton to a fabric that stretched across light-years.
At about 50 trillionths of a kelvin, the atoms' temperature is about a tenth of the previous record.