Trilogy

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trilogy

1. a series of three related works, esp in literature, etc.
2. (in ancient Greece) a series of three tragedies performed together at the Dionysian festivals

Trilogy

(language)
A strongly typed logic programming language with numerical constraint-solving over the natural numbers, developed by Paul Voda <voda@voda.ii.fmph.uniba.sk> at UBC in 1988. Trilogy is syntactically a blend of Prolog, Lisp, and Pascal. It contains three types of clauses: predicates (backtracking but no assignable variables), procedures (if-then-else but no backtracking; assignable variables), and subroutines (like procedures, but with input and system calls; callable only from top level or from other subroutines).

Development of Trilogy I stopped in 1991. Trilogy II, developed by Paul Voda 1988-92, was a declarative general purpose programming language, used for teaching and to write CL.

http://fmph.uniba.sk/~voda.

["The Constraint Language Trilogy: Semantics and Computations", P. Voda, Complete Logic Systems, 741 Blueridge Ave, North Vancouver BC, V7R 2J5].

Trilogy

A company founded in 1979 by Gene Amdahl to commercialize wafer scale integration and build supercomputers. It raised a quarter of a billion dollars, the largest startup funding in history, but could not create its 2.5" superchip. In 1984, it abandoned supercomputer development and later the superchip project. In 1985, Trilogy acquired Elxsi Corporation, a manufacturer of VAX-compatible systems, and eventually merged itself into Elxsi.


The Trilogy Superchip
The 2.5" square superchip was never completed, because it was far ahead of its time. Although chips from several semiconductor manufacturers have subsequently increased in size, there is no single chip as large as the Trilogy Superchip. (Image courtesy of Elxsi Corporation.)
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not actually as easy as it might sound even to produce a list of fantasy epic trilogies. Some turn out, sometimes only in retrospect or towards the last volume, to be science fiction: I am thinking of Sheri S.
In the majority of cases, as is well known, fantasy trilogies are set in a generic pseudo-medieval world, which accentuates the similarity with medieval romances.
If Tolkien's own novels clearly do not represent trilogies under this definition of the term, then Peter Jackson's film adaptations of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit certainly are trilogies, since the finished products were three individually intelligible movies telling a larger story over the course of all three.
Selected trilogies, sorted by highest-grossing chapter Trilogy B.O.