trolley

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trolley:

see streetcarstreetcar,
small, self-propelled railroad car, similar to the type used in rapid-transit systems, that operates on tracks running through city streets and is used to carry passengers.
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trolley

[′träl·ē]
(geology)
A basin-shaped depression in strata. Also known as lum.
(mechanical engineering)
A wheeled car running on an overhead track, rail, or ropeway.
An electric streetcar.

trolley

1. Brit (in a hospital) a bed mounted on casters and used for moving patients who are unconscious, immobilized, etc.
2. a device that collects the current from an overhead wire (trolley wire), third rail, etc., to drive the motor of an electric vehicle
3. a pulley or truck that travels along an overhead wire in order to support a suspended load
4. Chiefly Brit a low truck running on rails, used in factories, mines, etc., and on railways
References in periodicals archive ?
15 at the Leicester Senior Center will feature a talk by Ken Ethier of Auburn on "The Trolleys of Leicester."
The firm recovers lost and stolen trolleys in the epidemic that costs retailers pounds 20million each year.
On average around 50 trolleys are found a week in Wrexham, around the streets, and in rivers and streams.
The coin-operated system is used to ensure that customers park the trolleys in the designated safe zones after unloading their shopping into cars.
"Occasionally we find Carrefour or Co-op trolleys around here and we call them to come to pick them up, so the Dh1 system doesn't quite seem to work," says Devlani.
It was formed after the council found itself clearing 3,178 dumped trolleys from Liverpool's streets in just one year.
It is setting up a hotline to allow people to report abandoned shopping trolleys, which will be used to help recover them, map hotspots and identify a league of the most and least environmentally-responsible retailers.
THE TROLLEY bus was a form of transport inextricably linked with urban life in the 1950s and 1960s.
The Naaldwijk facility, one of the largest distribution centers in Europe, handles more than 10,000 trolleys of flowers every day from growers located within 100 miles of the auction site.
The 50 trolleys displayed at Queen's Square represent the average number of trolleys collected by Wrexham council every week.
Hay trolleys became an important element in the hay delivery system.
Workers from Trolleywise, the firm who retrieve trolleys for retailers across the country, were stunned at the numbers strewn around the town.