trophic level


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trophic level

[′träf·ik ‚lev·əl]
(ecology)
Any of the feeding levels through which the passage of energy through an ecosystem proceeds; examples are photosynthetic plants, herbivorous animals, and microorganisms of decay.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather, the sampled bivalve, gastropod, dragonfly and midge larvae were selected to represent various possible trophic levels within the macroinvertebrate assemblage.
The scientists then pair trends in trophic levels and carbon signatures with historical environmental data, deciphering the root cause for subtle but important changes in the ecosystem.
I present this activity after a lecture- and diagram-based introduction to the key ideas and terms associated with energy flow and trophic levels. For the instructor, it serves as a formative assessment of student progress with the ecology concepts of trophic levels, energy flow, and energy loss in food webs.
It was also noteworthy that the predator species occupying the higher trophic levels were relatively safer from agrochemicals
Therefore, documenting the effects of burning on leaf litter arthropods is important to understanding the effects of this practice on forest-dwelling species at higher trophic levels.
2) Post-1000 BP Paleo-Aleut diets are significantly higher in trophic level ([[delta].sup.15.N]) than those of pre-1000 BP Aleuts.
One of the more revealing statistics is that of transfer efficiency (TE), which describes the proportion of energy entering a trophic level that is transferred to the next trophic level.
Testing hypotheses of trophic level interactions: a boreal forest ecosystem.
Gradual recovery of the sea otter in recent years restored the third trophic level. Invertebrate grazers then declined, and the kelp forests and associated fauna recovered (Estes et al.
The more remote an organism is from the initial source of energy (solar radiation), the less probable that it will be dependent solely on the preceding trophic level as a source of energy.
In the simplest food webs, predators feed on the trophic level immediately below: a "top" predator feeds on an "intermediate" predator, which in turn feeds on herbivores or basal species.
Our results show that there was no apparent relationship between microbial biomass (or related variables), and plant biomass or NPP (Table 5), meaning that altering these plant variables did not lead to a corresponding alteration of biomass in the next highest trophic level (primary saprophytes) or the processes it regulates (soil [CO.sub.2] evolution, decomposition) over the course of the experiment.