tropical easterlies

tropical easterlies

[′träp·ə·kəl ′ēs·tər·lēz]
(meteorology)
The trade winds when shallow and exhibiting a strong vertical shear; at about 500 feet (152 meters) the easterlies give way to the upper westerlies, which are sufficiently strong and deep to govern the course of cloudiness and weather. Also known as subtropical easterlies.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the summer wears on, the deep tropical easterlies expand northward from the southern Gulf of Mexico into the southern states.
The conventional explanation for the extreme aridity found along the coastal strip of Peru is the influence of the Eastern Pacific High pressure cell together with forced subsidence of the tropical easterlies after crossing the mountain barrier of the Andes (Johnson [9]).
The easterly wind components observed in the Andes are driven by the tropical easterlies and well above the inversion layer.
At higher atmospheric levels, these air masses are then entrained into the tropical easterlies. There they carry relatively warm air (potential temperature ~37[degrees]C) to the west, further intensifying the inversion layer above the coastal plain.
El Nino boosts the atmosphere's angular momentum by slowing down the tropical easterlies and speeding the westerlies outside the tropics, says Salstein.

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