tropospheric scatter


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tropospheric scatter

[¦trōp·ə¦sfir·ik ′skad·ər]
(communications)
Scatter propagation of radio waves caused by irregularities in the refractive index of air in the troposphere; used for long-distance communications, with the aid of relay facilities, 180-300 miles (300-500 kilometers) apart. Also known as troposcatter.

tropospheric scatter

tropospheric scatter
The propagation of electromagnetic waves by scattering as a result of irregularities or discontinuities in the physical properties of the troposphere. At the frequencies above 150 MHz, the atmosphere has a scattering effect on electromagnetic fields. The scattering allows over-the-horizon communications at very high, ultrahigh, and microwave frequencies. This mode of communication is called tropospheric scatter, or troposcatter. Scattering can take place at low altitudes, but mostly it is at about 10 miles. To realize communication via troposcatter, overlong distances, high-gain antennae, high-power transmitters, and sensitive receivers are a must as path loss is high.
References in periodicals archive ?
Soldiers from the 842nd Signal Company, SGT Paul Kostelecky and SSG John Albert, along with CW3 Edwin Crews from the 335th Theater Signal Command replaced parts on the Tropospheric scatter communications equipment to make it operational.
Wilhelm, a tropospheric scatter radio team chief for the 578th.
He provided critical tactical satellite, tropospheric scatter radio and data communications support to several units including 3rd Infantry Division.
Soldiers from the 103rd ACS provided the connectivity power via the satellite dish that eventually linked Fort Dix with Fort Devens, and using a tropospheric scatter microwave radio terminal, set up a "shot" to the tropo at Fort Meade, a distance of about 150 miles.
Several sites of tropospheric scatter communication systems were installed to establish links with distant terminals.