trouble


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trouble

a. political unrest or public disturbances
b. the Troubles political violence in Ireland during the 1920s or in Northern Ireland since the late 1960s
References in classic literature ?
He meant trouble that might be developed in going to Honduras, and starting the search for the lost city and the idol of gold.
"Dat bloke was a dandy," said Pete, in conclusion, "but he hadn' oughta made no trouble. Dat's what I says teh dem: 'Don' come in here an' make no trouble,' I says, like dat.
"That is a trouble which I cannot cure, my child; but I shall try to make you feel it less.
Yesterday he even had some trouble with the police because of his thrashing the steward of these buildings.
But I was in such a hurry that I went off by myself; and I had no trouble in finding these good people.
It's right for me to do what I can to save you from getting into trouble for want o' your knowing where you're being led to.
What bit at his consciousness and was a painful incitement in it, was his desire to be with Skipper who was not right, and who was in trouble. He wanted Skipper.
"My only trouble would be gone if you resigned yourself to the lot that's been given us."
Huntingdon,' said Hargrave, as he arranged the men on the board, speaking distinctly, and with a peculiar emphasis, as if he had a double meaning to all his words, 'you are a good player, but I am a better: we shall have a long game, and you will give me some trouble; but I can be as patient as you, and in the end I shall certainly win.' He fixed his eyes upon me with a glance I did not like, keen, crafty, bold, and almost impudent; - already half triumphant in his anticipated success.
(5) over-solicitude for his men, which exposes him to worry and trouble.
I remember one afternoon in spring, when, owing to the rain, they could not go out; but, by some amazing good fortune, they had all finished their lessons, and yet abstained from running down to tease their parents--a trick that annoyed me greatly, but which, on rainy days, I seldom could prevent their doing; because, below, they found novelty and amusement--especially when visitors were in the house; and their mother, though she bid me keep them in the schoolroom, would never chide them for leaving it, or trouble herself to send them back.
In many cases it is inevitable that the shame is felt to be the worst part of crime; and it would have required a great deal of disentangling reflection, such as had never entered into Rosamond's life, for her in these moments to feel that her trouble was less than if her husband had been certainly known to have done something criminal.