true porcelain

true porcelain

[′trü ′pȯr·slən]
(materials)
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He said that Stile Porcelain tiles passed the tests for water absorption, which should be less than 0.5 per cent, ensuring that the product is true porcelain and will resist any stain; strength: which confirms that tiles meet the required strength as per the standards; resistance to surface abrasion: means tiles' surface is hard enough to sustain scratches and can be used at a high traffic areas; and slipperiness: which showed tiles are highly slip-resistant in wet and dry conditions.
Semivitreous ware was a type of porcelain that was not fired at the same high temperature as true porcelain. The mark you provided was used from 1900 to 1914.
Stile porcelain tiles was tested for Water Absorption, which should be less than 0.5% ensuring that the product is true porcelain and will resist any stain.
As Edmund de Waal outlines in his book The White Road, makers in Europe in the 18th C struggled to build furnaces capable of achieving temperatures high enough to melt kaolinitic clays to a glassy state: this hindered the production of a true porcelain which could match the greenwares and blue-and-white wares being imported from China.
Porcelain has become something of a generic term to cover many kinds of china, but to be considered true porcelain, the total clay content must be under 50 per cent.
Actually, "White Ding ware lacks the transparency of true porcelain." It is this rare shade of white, however, that attracted Edinburg's eye.
They're worth pounds 3, 000-pounds 4,000' A large pair of Dogs of Fo, made in about 1680 and crisply modelled in blanc-de-Chine, the name given by European collectors to the undecorated hard paste true porcelain made in China and much prized in the West.
The first true porcelain manufactured in the colonies was produced by Andrew Duche, a craftsman of Huguenot descent who had founded a pottery in Savannah, Ga., in 1730.
It has been said that no great innovations in ceramics have occurred since the 14th century in China, since even in Neolithic times some Chinese potters utilised a fast moving wheel in creating the eggshell thin, black Longquan pottery; discovered true porcelain by the Tang dynasty; rapidly developed advanced kiln technology; and perfected the use of underglaze copper and cobalt and had overglaze enamelling and so forth.
Until then, only the Chinese were capable of making true porcelain but in 1707, an apprentice pharmacist called Johann Friedrich Bottger managed to make a fine red stoneware.
Hard paste (or true porcelain) has always been appreciated in Europe, but its manufacturing processes were not fully understood until the 18th century when Johann Friedrich Bottger at Meissen discovered the correct formula which included the addition of kaolin.