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true

1. Music exactly in tune
2. (of a compass bearing) according to the earth's geographical rather than magnetic poles
3. Biology conforming to the typical structure of a designated type
4. Physics not apparent or relative; taking into account all complicating factors
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

true

[trü]
(geodesy)
Related to true north.
(science and technology)
Actual, as constrasted with fictitious, such as true sun.
Related to a fixed point, either on the earth or in space, in contrast with relative, which is related to a moving point.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
According to this view, any set of propositions other than the whole of truth can be condemned on purely logical grounds, as internally inconsistent; a single proposition, if it is what we should ordinarily call false, contradicts itself irremediably, while if it is what we should ordinarily call true, it has implications which compel us to admit other propositions, which in turn lead to others, and so on, until we find ourselves committed to the whole of truth.
The question of verifiability is in essence this: can we discover any set of beliefs which are never mistaken or any test which, when applicable, will always enable us to discriminate between true and false beliefs?
The existence and persistence of causal laws, it is true, must be regarded as a fortunate accident, and how long it will continue we cannot tell.
Thus the objective reference of a belief is not determined by the fact alone, but by the direction of the belief towards or away from the fact.* If, on a Tuesday, one man believes that it is Tuesday while another believes that it is not Tuesday, their beliefs have the same objective, namely the fact that it is Tuesday but the true belief points towards the fact while the false one points away from it.
This mode of stating the nature of the objective reference of a proposition is necessitated by the circumstance that there are true and false propositions, but not true and false facts.
Can you say that they are teachers in any true sense whose ideas are in such confusion?
SOCRATES: And in supposing that they will be useful only if they are true guides to us of action--there we were also right?
SOCRATES: And while he has true opinion about that which the other knows, he will be just as good a guide if he thinks the truth, as he who knows the truth?
SOCRATES: Then true opinion is as good a guide to correct action as knowledge; and that was the point which we omitted in our speculation about the nature of virtue, when we said that knowledge only is the guide of right action; whereas there is also right opinion.
Now this is an illustration of the nature of true opinions: while they abide with us they are beautiful and fruitful, but they run away out of the human soul, and do not remain long, and therefore they are not of much value until they are fastened by the tie of the cause; and this fastening of them, friend Meno, is recollection, as you and I have agreed to call it.