trullo


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trullo

A dry-walled rough stone shelter, circular in plan, with a corbeled domical roof, resembling ancient structures and still used in southern Italy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the Greek word trullo (cone), the oldest area contains about 400 trulli, where people still live today.
(22) Di li la regola, come afferma un professionista d'eccezione quale il medico Trullo, "che sempre in simili ferite coll'uscita dell'intestina seguiva l'istesso accidente del rigonfiarsi, e di piu che sempre il ferito veniva da crudelissimi dolori tormentato" (166-67).
Shortly after the Council of Trullo certain iconoclastic tendencies developed.
co.uk has from 1,000 a As the days passed in our trullo enclave, the group's growing appetite for supreme selfindulgence (ba.com) Stansted from com) To organise tour, visit Turismo Puglia(it) led to a surge in domestic activity.
While the name comes from a contraction of the words "cinema" and "Trullo," their Rome neighborhood, it also means "half-wit" in vernacular Italian.
And what may seem to many Catholics a surprising novelty, a council called (strangely, for many in the West) the Council in Trullo is increasingly being recognized as belonging among the ecumenical councils, without, however, the number of the ecumenical councils of the first millennium being raised from seven to eight.
Asi, en Oriente, el concilio de Trullo (691) acepto los 85 Canones para toda la Iglesia oriental, pero rechazo las Constituciones apostolicas por entender que habian sido falsificadas por los herejes; mientras que en Occidente nunca tuvieron fuerza de ley.
El Concilio del Trullo (Constantinopla, ano 692) exige que se den cartas de dimision a un clerigo que viaja a otra diocesis: <<Ningun clerigo, cualquiera que sea su grado, puede ser trasladado a otra iglesia (diocesis) sin tener las cartas dimisorias ([TEXTO IRREPRODUCIBLE EN ASCII]) escritas por su propio obispo>> (72).
* Canonical reforms, particularly those introduced by the Quinisext Council (the "Council in Trullo") in 691-692.
The Theodosian Code of 438 prohibited theater and circus performances on Sundays and festivals, and finally, the Council of Trullo (692) condemned plays altogether.