tubeworms


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tubeworms

[′tüb‚wərmz]
(invertebrate zoology)
Marine polychaete worms (particularly many species in the family Serpulidae) which construct permanent calcareous tubes on rocks, seaweeds, dock pilings, and ship bottoms. The individual tubes with hard walls of calcite-aragonite, ranging from 0.04 to 0.4 inch (1 millimeter to 1 centimeter) in diameter and from 0.16 to 4 inches (4 millimeters to 10 centimeters) in length, are firmly cemented to a hard substrate and to each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lower sulfide values reflect the fact that measurements were made at the tubeworm plumes, which are a considerable distance above the base of the vestimentiferan tubes where temperature and sulfide values are higher.
Thus, symbiont subtype composition of the cold seep tubeworms clearly varied across environmental patches but not as a result of associations with particular host species.
Fisher and his colleagues monitor tubeworm growth with an instrument they nicknamed "the hair dryer." They place the device, which resembles the large hair dryers used in salons, over a group of tubeworms and signal it to release a permanent dye.
In contrast, Pachydermia laevis has been reported consistently from collections of tubeworms and bivalves as well as alvinellids (Waren and Bouchet, 1989, 1993), and likely has broader habitat associations than the peltospirids.
Traveling to Tica Vent on the research vessel Atlantis, the biologists worked at a lush and thriving community of giant tubeworms and mussels.
Sperm storage, internal fertilization, and embryonic dispersal in vent and seep tubeworms (Polychaeta: Siboglinidae: Vestimentifera).
In the years leading up to my 1984 dive, I had learned that hydrothermal vent systems played a significant role in transferring heat and mass from the solid Earth to the ocean, and that the vent sites host unusual biological communities, including tubeworms, bivalves, crabs, and fish that thrive in the absence of sunlight.
Here we report on a non-chemoautotrophic seep bivalve, Acesta bullisi (Bivalvia; Limidae), that has evolved specialized mechanisms to exploit a unique source of nutrition derived ultimately from chemosynthesis: the energy-rich eggs of giant tubeworms. Opportunistic egg or embryo predators are common among terrestrial vertebrates (2, 3) and marine invertebrates (4).
The tiny star-shaped species, called ophiura ophiura, and the tubeworms, proper name pectinaria belgica, were ripped off their usual seabed habitat by the storms over the weekend.
When there is no current you have plenty of time to explore the canyons, with an abundance of tubeworms, sea squirts and feather stars in every color, even many photo opportunities.
Shrimp produce plenty of sheepshead and fiddler crabs usually do even better, but the saltiest of the old-timers swear by tubeworms as the primo sheepshead bait.
We note, however, that much of the sandy or muddy bottom investigated off Terre Adelie (eastern Antarctica) contained large angular pebbles, on which ascidians had settled (as they had on other sessile animals like sponges or tubeworms) (Monniot et al.