adenoma

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adenoma:

see neoplasmneoplasm
or tumor,
tissue composed of cells that grow in an abnormal way. Normal tissue is growth-limited, i.e., cell reproduction is equal to cell death. Feedback controls limit cell division after a certain number of cells have developed, allowing for tissue repair
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adenoma

[‚ad·ən′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A benign tumor of glandular origin and structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(142) The unique immunostaining patterns of p53 and Ki-67 are significant for differentiating the dysplastic lesions in IBD (Figure 3, B, C, E, and F) from a sporadic tubular adenoma (Figure 3, H and I).
Differential diagnosis of tubular adenomas includes malignancy and noncalcified fibroadenoma.
These diagnoses included the following: melanosis coli (in 4 specimens with tubular adenomas and 1 specimen with hyperplastic polyp), mucosal prolapse (in 2 specimens with hyperplastic polyps), schistosomiasis (Figures 4(a), 4(b), and 4(c)) (in 1 specimen with adenocarcinoma and 1 specimen with hyperplastic polyp), and intestinal spirochetosis (Figure 5) (in 1 specimen with sessile serrated adenoma), and they were confirmed retrospectively by both of us.
All patients who underwent a complete colonoscopy for the first time, for any indication (including average risk screening, family history of colon cancer or polyps, changes in bowel habits, abdominal pain, weight loss, positive fecal occult blood test, chronic diarrhea, anemia, rectal bleeding, melena with negative EGD, and abnormal imaging study) as documented in the CPRS medical record that were found with a pathologic diagnosis of hyperplastic polyp, tubular adenoma, tubulovillous adenoma, villous adenoma and colon adenocarcinoma from January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005 were included.
In a study of 37 cases of benign breast tumors associated with pregnancy by O'Hara et al, only eight cases were lactating adenomas.(1) The others were fibroadenomas with lactational changes and tubular adenomas.
Twenty three of the 24 lesions were carcinomas, and 1 lesion was a tubular adenoma. All 24 lesions revealed no abnormalities in the exon 8 region by sequencing.
A prospective study from Denmark found the prevalence of duodenal tubular adenoma polyps to be 0.4% (5).
Tubular adenoma was the commonest association (7 cases) followed by Tubulovillous adenoma (6 cases) and finally the villous adenoma (4 cases).
[5] revealed that 48% of appendectomy specimens with diverticulosis harbored appendiceal neoplasms including well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoid), mucinous adenoma, tubular adenoma, and adenocarcinoma.
Of the patients who underwent colonoscopy before LT, two (2.0%) had adenoma with villous components, 13 (13.0%) had low-grade tubular adenoma, three (3.0%) had hyperplastic polyps, and one (1.0%) had inflammatory polyps.
Histological analysis of these lesions was tubular adenoma (n = 3)and hyperplastic polyps (n= 6).
Shahinian et al (36) first reported a case of tubular adenoma of the main pancreatic duct.