tulipomania


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tulipomania

tulip craze in Holland during which fortunes were lost. [Eur. Hist.: WB, 19: 394]
See: Fads
References in periodicals archive ?
It must be more than just a "pretty flower." After all, during the height of tulipomania people were assaulted and jailed over disputes surrounding the tulip, and bulbs were traded for gold, land, businesses, and dowry.
"Dash is a terrific historical researcher and storyteller, as anyone knows who has read Tulipomania, about the 17th century speculative bubble (perhaps the world's first) over tulip bulbs, or Batavia's Graveyard, a thumping great tale of human savagery in the South Seas.
The country was in the grip of "tulipomania," and the only thing that would break the spell was the inevitable bursting of the bubble.
[1] Mike Dash, Tulipomania: the story of the world's most coveted flower and the extraordinary passions it aroused (New York: Three Rivers Press, 1999): 19
This was never more clearly demonstrated than between 1634 and 1637 when an obsession known as "tulipomania" grabbed the nation's gardeners.
In Holland, the financial hysteria called tulipomania reached its peak 100 years later, when bulbs changed hands for thousands of pounds each.
Batavia's Graveyard by Mike Dash (Weidenfeld and Nicolson (14.99 [pounds sterling]) follows the author's previous success, Tulipomania, with a study of the aftermath of `history's bloodiest mutiny' aboard a Dutch East India ship in 1628-29.
In fact, so-called tulipomania broke out in Amsterdam back in 1634!
FLOWERS OF GREED Tulips in the ages of exuberance Discussed in this essay: Tulipomania, by Mike Dash.
They come from a group that dates back to the days of tulipomania, which reached its height in 1637 when 99 high-quality bulbs were sold for the equivalent of pounds 2.2 million in today's money.
(63.) See MIKE DASH, TULIPOMANIA: THE STORY OF THE WORLD'S MOST COVETED FLOWER AND THE EXTRAORDINARY PASSIONS IT AROUSED 187-95 (2000); see also sources cited supra note 44.
Tulipomania, by Mike Dash, retells yet again the story of the flower craze, emphasizing the economic context of the bubble and its effects on Dutch society and culture.