Tulipwood


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Tulipwood

1.
2. A soft, close-textured durable wood that is yellowish in color; used for millwork and veneer. See also: Masonite

tulipwood

1. A soft, close-textured durable wood, yellowish in color; used for millwork and veneer.
2. A rose-colored, very hard wood from Brazil; esp. used for inlay work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditionally, cross-laminated timber is made from softwood, yet this project demonstrates the real potential for using tulipwood, an abundant, relatively inexpensive and structurally impressive American hardwood.
The other major species exported were ash, white oak and and tulipwood at volumes of 7,616 m 3 , 6,902 m 3 and 6,451 m 3 respectively.
Hogue has also pioneered the use of many exotic woods in off-the-shelf custom grips including goncalo alves, pau ferro, rosewood, kingwood, tulipwood and cocobolo.
"The kitchen worktops are Forest Stewardship Council recommended and made from sustainable tulipwood."
In sumptuous shades of tulipwood, moss green or black and delicately trimmed with cut out lace, the popstar's new Glamour range of lingerie is the perfect gift to treat yourself and your beau.
American Tulipwood (Liriodendron tulipifera), supplied by Rochester-based Morgan's Timber Yard, was used to clad this award-winning intervention in an east London community church.
Its best-seller is made from Tulipwood and finished in any colour from the Farrow And Ball, Dulux or Sanderson paint ranges.
Various inlays of different timber include tulipwood, kingwood, box, etc plus brass, gilt metal, tortoiseshell and so on as additional beautification.
Red oak, white oak, maple, ash, cherry and tulipwood remain the most popular species.
In addition to micarta and assorted polymers and laminates, grips for the Bisley, for example, can be had in the following fancy hardwoods; coco bola, ebony, goncalo, kingwood, pau ferro, rosewood, tulipwood, and walnut.
A 1924 Hispano-Suiza racer, built for French aperitif heir Andre Dubonnet, features a lightweight body constructed of varnished tulipwood and held together by brass rivets.
1770-72, Thomas Chippendale (1718-79), ormolu-mounted satinwood, padouk, amaranth, tulipwood and marquetry, 88 x 153.5 x 64cm.