tumbling mill

tumbling mill

[′təm·bliŋ ‚mil]
(mechanical engineering)
A grinding and pulverizing machine consisting of a shell or drum rotating on a horizontal axis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"When they shut down a tumbling mill to put the liners in, it may cost $50,000 to $100,000 an hour profit at a gold mine, so when it goes down, it's critical that we have castings at site in advance," Fulton said.
They process the ore extracted from the earth in large tumbling mills. The longer existing mines are open, the deeper the pits, and typically at a lower grade of ore.
The VertiMill|TM~ was developed as an energy-saving alternative to the tumbling mill in fine grinding operations.
For years, the tumbling mill was an articulating chain-type conveyor that did create some parts-jamming potential, as well as a significant maintenance cost as the chain and mill components wore.
1880-87 - Sly tumbling mill, the first such cleaning mill in foundries, is developed by W.W.
The literature reported that the power estimation of tumbling mills plays an important role in determining the grinding efficiency and mill performance [4, 5].
[10] Cleary, P.W., 2001, Recent advances in DEM modeling of tumbling mills, Minerals Engineering, Vol.
Jaw, gyratory and cone crushers dominate crushing operations and grinding is still for the most part carried out in tumbling mills. The latter, in particular, are extremely inefficient in their use of energy and promotion of mineral liberation.