tumulus


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Related to tumulus: burial mound

tumulus

(to͞o`myələs), plural tumuli (–lī), in archaeology, a heap of earth or stones placed over a grave. The terms moundmound,
prehistoric earthwork erected as a memorial or landmark over a burial place, a defensive embankment, or a site for ceremonial or religious rites or other functions.
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, barrowbarrow,
in archaeology, a burial mound. Earth and stone or timber are the usual construction materials; in parts of SE Asia stone and brick have entirely replaced earth. A barrow built primarily of stone is often called a cairn.
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, or cairncairn,
pile of stones, usually conical in shape, raised as a landmark or a memorial. In prehistoric times it was usually erected over a burial. A barrow is sometimes called a cairn.
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 are more common in modern usage.

tumulus

A mound of earth or stone protecting a tomb chamber or simple grave; a barrow, 2.

tumulus

Archaeol (no longer in technical usage) another word for barrow2
References in periodicals archive ?
The low hillock of Laona, on which the tumulus was raised, lies one kilometre to the east of the sanctuary of Aphrodite from where it is clearly visible.
Baughan finds that in some tombs klinai were clearly conceived as banqueting couches--as in Tumulus II, Karaburun, which features a banqueter reclining on a kline in a painted scene on the rear wall of the tomb, above the actual couch.
A set of medicine tools which was found in the city of Tomis and is currently in Romania National Museum (11(p.110-11)) has similarities to the finds of Dulgata Mogila Tumulus in terms of workmanship with their silverwork over bronze.
"This and its unusual construction with thick horizontal layers of marl alternating with layers of red soil, make the Laona tumulus a special if not unique monument in the Cypriot landscape."
Scorpions, Foraging, Prey, Hottentotta tumulus, Odontobuthus odonturus
Among the topics are social landscape and tumuli burials in Late Bronze and Early Iron Age southeastern Albania, the untraditional use of mounds in Thrace during the Late Iron Age, tumuli as points of interest in Greek and Latin sources, a tumulus as a door between two worlds, and the use of GIS technologies to study the spatial and time concentration of tumuli in the Scythian-time lower Dnieper region.
The first ritual can be seen in the necropolis of Los praditos, Mesas de Asta, and at Tumulus I in Las Cumbres (Torres 2004: 426-428).
Woodland covers ground on our right as we follow the well-marked route below Hambleton End and Black Hambleton with a tumulus (burial mound) prominent on the left of our route.
In Mike's Garage on a street named after Eliza Lucas Pinckney, who introduced indigo to Charleston in 1744, Ann Hamilton accumulated a tumulus of 48,000 worker's pants and shirts, each one carefully folded and stacked.
In Welsh folklore, the summit of Snowdon is said to be the tomb of a giant, hence the name Yr Wyddfa, tumulus, but the mountain's real story holds its own fantasy.
Meet at 10am at Llantwit Major train station for A Porthcawl Tumulus, St David's Well and railway line.
Oes yn wir mae yna lwmp neu domen i'w gweld yn y cae ger yr A5 ond fy argraff gyntaf i o'r safle fydda awgrymu mai carnedd gladdu neu "tumulus" Oes Efydd yw hon mewn gwirionedd.