tune


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Related to tune: tuner

tune

1. a melody, esp one for which harmony is not essential
2. the most important part in a musical texture
3. the condition of producing accurately pitched notes, intervals, etc. (esp in the phrases in tune, out of tune)
4. accurate correspondence of pitch and intonation between instruments (esp in the phrases in tune, out of tune)
5. the correct adjustment of a radio, television, or some other electronic circuit with respect to the required frequency (esp in the phrases in tune, out of tune)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tune

[tün]
(electronics)
To adjust for resonance at a desired frequency.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tune

(jargon)
(From musical, possibly via automotive, usage) To optimise a program or system for a particular environment, especially by adjusting numerical parameters designed as hooks for tuning, e.g. by changing "#define" lines in C. One may "tune for time" (fastest execution), "tune for space" (least memory use), or "tune for configuration" (most efficient use of hardware).

See bum, hot spot, hand-hacking.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in classic literature ?
His excuses were cut short by Tom Platt launching into a most dolorous tune, like unto the moaning of winds and the creaking of masts.
Then Manuel touched the jangling, jarring little nachette to a queer tune, and sang something in Portuguese about "Nina, innocente!" ending with a full-handed sweep that brought the song up with a jerk.
As soon as he had repeated the tune and lowered his fiddle, he bowed again to the Squire and the rector, and said, "I hope I see your honour and your reverence well, and wishing you health and long life and a happy New Year.
But thereupon he immediately began to prelude, and fell into the tune which he knew would be taken as a special compliment by Mr.
You can't SING "Above wonderfully there," because it simply won't go to the tune, without damaging the singer; but it is a most clingingly exact translation of DORT OBEN WUNDERBAR--fits it like a blister.
Now that I've found such pleasant company, I can talk and play tunes all I want to."
"A tune much iterated has the ridiculous effect of making the words in my mind perform a sort of minuet to keep time--an effect hardly tolerable, I imagine, after boyhood.
We may imagine Governor Shirley and General Pepperell riding slowly along the line, while the drummers beat strange old tunes, like psalm-tunes, and all the officers and soldiers put on their most warlike looks.
Thwackum and Square likewise sung to the same tune. They were now
His daughter, though she was a perfect mistress of music, and would never willingly have played any but Handel's, was so devoted to her father's pleasure, that she learnt all those tunes to oblige him.
Craig; "it's not to be named by side o' the Scotch tunes. I've never cared about singing myself; I've had something better to do.
Standing on a projecting rock, he played several tunes in the hope that the fish, attracted by his melody, would of their own accord dance into his net, which he had placed below.