tungsten filament

tungsten filament

[′təŋ·stən ′fil·ə·mənt]
(electricity)
A filament used in incandescent lamps, and as an incandescent cathode in many types of electron tubes, such as thermionic vacuum tubes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high-energy beam is created when a tungsten filament is superheated in a "gun" (a containment device with an opening), which creates a cloud of electrons that accelerate to approximately one-half the speed of light.
Which illuminating item was tungsten filament commonly used to make?
Surrounding an oversized tungsten filament bulb is a beehive-shaped, seeded ribbed glass diffuser, which gives this Knox pendant beautiful texture, hudsonvalleylighting.com
The products harness a low mass tungsten filament, which has been engineered to respond rapidly to changes in voltage.
The frosted bulbs are the same size and shape as a traditional light bulb, but instead of a tungsten filament contain a wound copper filament about the size of a AA battery in their core.
4 Lighting power: Halogen lamps are no more energy-efficient than old-fashioned tungsten filament lamps.
(3) Comparison between the model LDA4L/C for the Japanese market (rated power of 4.4 W, rated life of 40,000 hours, and total flux of 210 lumens) and a 100-volt 20-watt light bulb (rated power of 20 W, rated life of 1,500 hours, and total flux of 175 lumens) as specified in the Japan Industrial Standards JIS C7501 "Tungsten filament lamps for general lighting purposes." The rated life is the number of hours of use until the total luminous flux (brightness) becomes 70% of the initial value.
Inside, a hot tungsten filament was heated to 1500 degrees Celsius, causing the oxygen molecules to dissociate into atomic oxygen.
Light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, are currently used in electronic equipment, bicycle lights and roadside signs and are seen as a good replacement for tungsten filament light bulbs.
Forty watt bulbs are the sole survivors of the evolution from carbon to tungsten filament in 1910.
THE final stage in the phasing out of tungsten filament light bulbs is a reminder (if one were needed) of the arrogant bureaucratic nature of the accursed European Union.
These bulbs are a wee bit bigger than standard incandescent bulbs (that use a tungsten filament to produce light).