tuning range

tuning range

[′tün·iŋ ‚rānj]
(electronics)
The frequency range over which a receiver or other piece of equipment can be adjusted by means of a tuning control.
References in periodicals archive ?
6-GHz 1-V wide tuning range frequency synthesizer with Gm-boosting colpitts VCO for biomedical application, Bioelectronics and Bioinformatics (ISBB), 1-5.
The dynamics of the reactions involved will result in a wide range of product rotational and vibrational states being populated, and therefore a broad overall wavelength tuning range, without needing to change optics within the laser, is required so that the laser can rapidly move from one transition to another.
This extraordinary, new laser system features ultrashort pulses over a very broad tuning range of 680 to 1300 nm for deepest imaging, delivering continuous, fully-automated tuning from a single beam.
The Ring-VCOs take a small area on a chip and can provide very wide tuning range but their phase noise performance is very poor when compared to LC-VCOs.
With a 70 MHz tuning range, selectable channel width and 128-bit encryption available for secure transmission, it makes this one of the most versatile SATEL products available.
The proposed filter has the characteristic of two independently adjustable stopbands, wide tuning range and significant size reduction compared with the conventional structure in [14].
Two chip capacitors Cg are adopted to optimize the return loss and insertion loss to achieve a better performance in the tuning range.
The solutions have enabled Sennheiser to developed tunable high-order filters whose pass bands are synchronised over a wide tuning range, without using an input low noise amplifier.
Versatility is further enhanced by the extended wavelength tuning range (680 to 1080 nm), which enables optimum excitation of red fluorophores such as m-cherry.
In one box, it combines a wide tuning range, high group velocity dispersion (GVD) compensation, high power and optimum pointing stability.
Unfortunately, CRO/SAW oscillators have several disadvantages, including a limited tuning range (which limits the amount of correction that can be made to compensate for the tolerances of other components in the oscillator circuit), and sensitivity to microphonics and phase hits.
The integral of this random, broadband noise power across the tuning range is the total source spontaneous emission (SSE), a basic limitation to the measurement dynamic range (Figure 1).